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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Maricopa, Arizona » U.S. Arid Land Agricultural Research Center » Pest Management and Biocontrol Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #210429

Title: Trap catches of the sweetpotato whitefly (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) in the Imperial Valley, Caiifornia, from 1996 to 2002

Author
item CHU, CHANG-CHI
item BARNES, EDWARD
item NATWICK, ERIC
item CHEN, TIAN-YE
item RITTER, DAVID
item HENNEBERRY, THOMAS

Submitted to: Insect Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/15/2006
Publication Date: 4/1/2007
Citation: Chu, C., Barnes, E., Natwick, E.T., Chen, T., Ritter, D., Henneberry, T.J. 2007. Trap catches of the sweetpotato whitefly (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) in the Imperial Valley, Caiifornia, from 1996 to 2002. Insect Science 14:165-170.

Interpretive Summary: An outbreak of the sweetpotato whitefly occurred in the Imperial Valley, California in 1991. The insects destroyed melon crops and seriously damaged other vegetables, ornamentals and row crops. As a result of the need for sampling technology, we developed a whitefly trap that could be left in the field for extended time periods. We used the traps to monitor populations of whitefly adults during year-round samplings from 1996 to 2002 to study variations in the weekly trap catches of the insect. The greatest number of whitefly adults was recorded in 1996, followed by a continuing annual decrease in trap catches each year through 2002. The overall decline of whitefly is attributed in part to the adoption of integrated pest management (IPM) program initiated in 1992 and reduced melon hectares from 1996 to 2002. Other factors may also have contributed to the population reductions. Seasonally, whitefly trap catches decreased during the late summer and fall concurrent with decreasing minimum temperatures that are suggested to be a significant factor affecting seasonal activity and reproduction.

Technical Abstract: An outbreak of the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), biotype B occurred in the Imperial Valley, California in 1991. The insects destroyed melon crops and seriously damaged other vegetables, ornamentals and row crops. As a result of the need for sampling technology, we developed a whitefly trap (named the CC trap) that could be left in the field for extended time periods. We used the traps to monitor populations of B. tabaci adults during year-round samplings from 1996 to 2002 to study variations in the weekly trap catches of the insect. The greatest number of B. tabaci adults was recorded in 1996, followed by a continuing annual decrease in trap catches each year through 2002. The overall decline of B. tabaci is attributed in part to the adoption of integrated pest management (IPM) program initiated in 1992 and reduced melon hectares from 1996 to 2002. Other factors may also have contributed to the population reductions. Seasonally, B. tabaci trap catches decreased during the late summer and fall concurrent with decreasing minimum temperatures that are suggested to be a significant factor affecting seasonal activity and reproduction.