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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: RESPONSE OF SEEDLING BIRD VETCH (VICCIA CRACCA) TO SIX HERBICIDES)

Author
item Seefeldt, Steven - Steve
item Conn, Jeffery - Jeff
item Jackson, B
item Sparrow, S

Submitted to: Weed Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/5/2007
Publication Date: 7/20/2007
Citation: Seefeldt, S.S., Conn, J.S., Jackson, B.E., Sparrow, S.D. 2007. Response of seedling bird vetch (Viccia cracca) to six herbicides. Weed Technology. 21(3):692-694.

Interpretive Summary: Bird vetch (Viccia cracca) is a perennial Eurasian plant that was introduced into North America over 140 years ago. Unlike many invasive weed species, this plant invades low fertility areas that have not been disturbed and it is common in pastures, woodland, and tall forb communities. It is rapidly expanding along roadsides and in urbanized areas in Alaska and has also invaded low density aspen (Populus tremuloides) stands. A greenhouse study was conducted to determine whether any of six herbicides would have potential for controlling bird vetch seedlings. Chlorsulfuron and 2,4-DB did not kill bird vetch seedlings at normal use rates; however, they were killed with rates of clopyralid, dicamba+diflufenzopyr, triclopyr, and 2,4-D that were a fourth to an eighth of the normal use rate. These results are important for developing effective, low cost methods for controlling bird vetch in Alaska.

Technical Abstract: Bird vetch (Viccia cracca) is a perennial Eurasian plant that was introduced into North America over 140 years ago. Unlike many invasive weed species, this plant invades low fertility areas that have not been disturbed and it is common in pastures, woodland, and tall forb communities. It is rapidly expanding along roadsides and in urbanized areas in Alaska and has also invaded low density aspen (Populus tremuloides) stands. A replicated greenhouse study was conducted to determine efficacy of six herbicides for controlling bird vetch seedlings. Bird vetch seedlings were tolerant of reduced rates of chlorsulfuron, and 2,4-DB; however, they were killed with rates of clopyralid, dicamba+diflufenzopyr, triclopyr, and 2,4-D that were a fourth to an eighth of the full label rate. These results are important for developing effective, low cost methods for controlling bird vetch in Alaska.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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