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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Forage Seed and Cereal Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #184246

Title: ASSESSING THE POTENTIAL FOR AUGMENTATIVE BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF BURROWING SHRIMP IN ESTUARINE OYSTER AQUACULTURE

Author
item Dumbauld, Brett
item CHAPMAN, J
item KURIS, A
item ASHLEY, E
item HEERHARTZ, S
item MARKHAM, J
item TORCHIN, M

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/10/2005
Publication Date: 3/18/2005
Citation: Dumbauld, B.R., Chapman, J., Kuris, A., Ashley, E., Heerhartz, S., Markham, J., Torchin, M. 2005. Assessing the potential for augmentative biological control of burrowing shrimp in estuarine oyster aquaculture. Meeting Abstract.

Interpretive Summary: Two species of burrowing shrimp cause oyster mortality in aquaculture operations and have been managed using the pesticide carbaryl for the last 40 years, primarily in Washington state coastal estuaries. In a search for alternatives to pesticide use, an assessment of the presence and prevalence of parasitic natural enemies of these shrimp was conducted to determine whether there were any available tools for augmentative biological control. Ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis) from Willapa Bay and Grays Harbor, Washington were infected with four species of larval nematodes which are trophically transmitted, probably via teleost fish. Mud shrimp (Upogebia puggettensis) were heavily infected with a bopyrid isopod (Orthione griffenis) in the branchial chamber. Isopod prevalence was extremely high (>85%) at some locations and data collected at one site over the last 8 years suggests that prevalence has increased markedly over time, while the shrimp population has declined over the same period. This isopod was not previously described and recent evidence suggests it may also occur in Japan. Effects on shrimp populations could be unprecedented and are important, not only for possible benefit to aquaculture, but also as a detriment to these shrimp populations which have a large influence on estuarine ecology.

Technical Abstract: Two species of burrowing shrimp cause oyster mortality in aquaculture operations and have been managed using the pesticide carbaryl for the last 40 years, primarily in Washington state coastal estuaries. In a search for alternatives to pesticide use, an assessment of the presence and prevalence of parasitic natural enemies of these shrimp was conducted to determine whether there were any available tools for augmentative biological control. Ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis) from Willapa Bay and Grays Harbor, Washington were infected with four species of larval nematodes which are trophically transmitted, probably via teleost fish. Mud shrimp (Upogebia puggettensis) were heavily infected with a bopyrid isopod (Orthione griffenis) in the branchial chamber. Isopod prevalence was extremely high (>85%) at some locations and data collected at one site over the last 8 years suggests that prevalence has increased markedly over time, while the shrimp population has declined over the same period. This isopod was not previously described and recent evidence suggests it may also occur in Japan. Effects on shrimp populations could be unprecedented and are important, not only for possible benefit to aquaculture, but also as a detriment to these shrimp populations which have a large influence on estuarine ecology.