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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Hilo, Hawaii » Daniel K. Inouye U.S. Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center » Tropical Crop and Commodity Protection Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #181952

Title: NICOTINAMIDE IN RELATION TO DIETARY NICOTINIC ACID AND OTHER NINE VITAMINS AND LARVAL DEVELOPMENT OF CERATITIS CAPITATA (DIPTERA: TEPHRITIDAE)

Author
item CHO, IL KYU
item Chang, Chiou
item QUING, X. LI

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/13/2005
Publication Date: 8/10/2005
Citation: Cho, I., Chang, C.L., Quing, X. 2005. Nicotinamide in Relation to Dietary Nicotinic Acid and Nine Other Vitamins and Larval Development of Ceratitis Capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae). Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 53:7307-7311.

Interpretive Summary: This study was to understand why Ceratitis capitata larvae reared on a diet fortified with nine vitamins except nicotinic acid had 100% mortality while those reared on ten vitamins-free diet remained 66% survival (Chang and Li, Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 2004, 97: 536-540). Nicotinamide was detected at a level of 0.07 µg/g in second-instar larvae reared on the ten vitamins-free diet and 0.30 µg/g in the corresponding spent diet while it was not detected in both the larvae reared on and the spent diet fortified with 707 µg/g of nine vitamins except nicotinic acid. Nicotinamide was detected at concentrations of 0.13 and 0.15 µg/g in the larvae fed on the diets that were fortified with the nine vitamins (707 µg/g) and 2 and 20 µg/g of nicotinic acid, respectively, but it was not found in the larvae fed on the 0.2 µg/g of nicotinic acid diet. Nicotinamide was detected at concentrations of 0.44, 0.52 and 0.55 µg/g in the spent diets that were fortified with the nine vitamins (707 µg/g) and 0.2, 2 and 20 µg/g of nicotinic acid, respectively. The results suggest a positive relationship between C. capitata larvae survival rates and concentrations of dietary nicotinic acid and nicotinamide in the larvae as well as spent diets. This finding suggests that nicotinamide derived from supplement nicotinic acid is essential for the development and survival of C. capitata larvae.

Technical Abstract: This study was conducted using HPLC to detect the nicotinamide level in the diet and larvae after fruit fly larvae intake of dietary niacin to answer the question of why larvae reared on a diet fortified with nine vitamins except nicotinic acid had 100% mortality while those reared on then vitamins-free diet remained 66% survival and the relationship between larvae survival rates and concentrations of dietary nicotinic acid and nicotinamide in the larvae as well as spend diets.