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Title: IRRADIATION AS A PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENT FOR INSECTS AND MITES ON AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES

Author
item Follett, Peter
item GRIFFIN, ROBERT
item GRIFFIN, EMILIA BUSTOS

Submitted to: Research Signpost: Recent Development in Entomology
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/24/2005
Publication Date: 7/6/2006
Citation: Follett, P.A., Griffin, R., Griffin, E. 2006. Irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment for insects and mites on agricultural commodities. Research Signpost: Recent Rers. Devel. Entomol. 5:1-26.

Interpretive Summary: Irradiation is a versatile technology to disinfest fresh and durable agricultural commodities of quarantine pests. Irradiation is broadly effective against insects and mites, and generally does not significantly reduce commodity quality at the doses used to control insect pests. Research methodology specific to developing irradiation treatments to control insects is presented, and several research issues including probit 9, generic treatments, and varietal testing are discussed. The recent publication of an international standard on the use of irradiation as a phytosanitary measure, and the establishment of generic doses for tephritid fruit flies and other insect groups, will promote wider acceptance and application of the technology.

Technical Abstract: Trade in agricultural commodities is growing at a rapid rate. At the same time that agricultural trade is increasing, the probability of introducing exotic insects into areas where they may become pests will increase. Quarantine or phytosanitary treatments eliminate, sterilize or kill regulatory pests in exported commodities to prevent their introduction and establishment into new areas. Irradiation is a versatile technology to disinfest fresh and durable agricultural commodities of quarantine pests. Irradiation is broadly effective against insects and mites, and generally does not significantly reduce commodity quality at the doses used to control insect pests. Research methodology specific to developing irradiation treatments to control insects is presented, and several research issues including probit 9, generic treatments, and varietal testing are discussed. The recent publication of an international standard on the use of irradiation as a phytosanitary measure, and the establishment of generic doses for tephritid fruit flies and other insect groups, will promote wider acceptance and application of the technology.