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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Horticultural Crops Research Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #177600

Title: WHO IS IN YOUR ROOTS?--LOOKING FOR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI ON BLUEBERRIES IN AUSTRALIA

Author
item Scagel, Carolyn
item MCLEAN, CASSANDRA

Submitted to: Australian Blueberry Grower
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/28/2005
Publication Date: 5/1/2005
Citation: Scagel, C.F., Mclean, C. 2005. Who is in your roots?--looking for mycorrhizal fungi on blueberries in Australia. Austrailian Blueberry Grower. 14:18-21.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Many small fruit and nursery crops in the plant family Ericaceae (e.g. blueberry and rhododendron) form specific associations with ericoid mycorrhizal fungi (EMF), yet there is almost no information concerning how these fungi influence the physiology of their host plants in horticultural production systems. Although the importance of EMF has been documented in a few natural ecosystems, their role in horticultural production systems for ericaceous plants in the United States and Australia has not been well studied. In October and November 2004, Dr. Carolyn Scagel, a research scientist with the USDA-ARS, visited several blueberry growing locations in Australia as part of a fellowship funded by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and worked with researchers in the laboratory of Dr. Cassandra McLean at University of Melbourne, Burnley. The purpose of the trip was to determine what fungi are present on the root systems of blueberry in Australia and compare the diversity and attributes of EMF from blueberry in Australia and the United States to increase our understanding of the role that these fungi play in blueberry production in both countries. The results from this preliminary comparison will be used to develop future studies to evaluate the function or role of EMF as it relates to productivity and production practices of Vaccinium.