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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: THE "ROLLING STORE": A PILOT INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE DIET AND HEALTH IN THE LOWER MISSISSIPPI DELTA (LMD))

Author
item Kennedy, Betty
item Ryan, Donna
item Williamson, Donald
item Champagne, Catherine
item Harsha, David
item Volaufova, Julia
item Bogle, Margaret

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/12/2003
Publication Date: 4/23/2004
Citation: Kennedy, B.M., Ryan, D.H., Williamson, D., Champagne, C.M., Harsha, D.W., Volaufova, J., Bogle, M.L. 2004. The "Rolling Store": A pilot intervention to improve diet and health in the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) [abstract]. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 18(4):A98.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Surveys of LMD residents demonstrate high levels of obesity and associated chronic diseases, and problems with access to healthy foods. This was a 6-month pilot study testing feasibility of the "Rolling Store," a food delivery medium providing healthy food choices (e.g. fruits and vegetables) to prevent weight gain in African American women. It was based on the hypothesis that access to healthy foods, economically within reach, may lead to direct improvement of diet quality and adoption of healthy eating habits. This may prevent weight gain and/or implement weight loss. Forty women (20 per group) were randomly assigned to 1) control- an intervention with nutrition education and physical activity information only, or 2) treatment- 6 monthly group classes taught by a health study coordinator on nutrition education and physical activity, plus weekly shopping on the "Rolling Store". Two-sample t-tests compared the difference between groups. Although the primary purpose of the program was to prevent weight gain, participants in the treatment group lost an average of 1.9 kg, while the control group gained 1.1 kg. The 'Rolling Store' was feasible, accessible, and economical in producing satisfactory health outcomes. This model could be easily adapted to a larger scale, removing geographic and transportation barriers to healthy food choices encountered by poor and rural populations. Supported by USDA, ARS Project #6251-53000-003-00D.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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