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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: SELF-REPORTED DISEASE AND NUTRIENT INTAKE IN RESIDENTS OF THE LOWER MISSISSIPPI DELTA (LMD))

Author
item Santell, Ross
item Nonoyama, Atsuko
item Gossett, Jeff
item Simpson, Pippa
item Champagne, Catherine

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/12/2003
Publication Date: 4/23/2004
Citation: Santell, R., Nonoyama, A., Gossett, J.M., Simpson, P., Champagne, C.M. 2004. Self-reported disease and nutrient intake in residents of the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) [abstract]. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 18(4):A380.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: This study evaluated the relationship among diet and obesity (BMI >/ 30,calculated from self-reported height & weight), heart disease (HD), hypertension (HTP) and diabetes, in a representative sample of African American (AA) and Caucasian (C) adults from 36 counties in the LMD. Food intake was assessed by multiple-pass 24-hour recalls coded by trained coders using a database system that utilizes CSFII food codes and produces identical nutrient information. Self-reported health was assessed by whether their physicians had informed them of disease. Results: Obesity, diabetes and HTP were higher in AA (p < 0.02), HD was higher in C(p < 0.04). Total fat (TF), saturated fat (SF), cholesterol (CH) or kilocalories (KCAL) were not different overall in obese; TF, SF, CH and KCAL were lower in obese AA than non-obese AA (p < 0.05); TF and KCAL were higher in obese C (p < 0.05). TF, SF, CH and KCAL were lower in AA with HD than those without (p < 0.05). TF, SF, and KCAL were lower in AA with HPT (p < 0.05) than those without; whereas, only SF was lower in C with HTP (p < 0.05). TF, SF and KCAL were lower in AA diabetics (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Nutrients such as TF, SF and KCAL, often related to CVD and HTP, were consumed significantly less in AA but not different in C reporting these diseases. One possibility is that disease markedly changes eating patterns in AA while C remain unresponsive. Supported by USDA, ARS Project # 6251-53000-003-00D.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
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