Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: COMMERCIAL ASPECTS OF CLONING AND GENETIC MODIFICATION IN CATTLE)

Author
item Lewis, I
item French, A
item Tecirlioglu, R
item Vajta, G
item Mcclintock, A
item Nicholas, K
item Zuelke, Kurt
item Holland, M
item Trounson, A

Submitted to: Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/29/2003
Publication Date: 12/14/2004
Citation: Lewis, I.M., French, A.J., Tecirlioglu, R.T., Vajta, G., Mcclintock, A.E., Nicholas, K.R., Zuelke, K.A., Holland, M.K., Trounson, A.O. 2004. Commercial aspects of cloning and genetic modification in cattle. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture. 44(11):1105-1111.

Interpretive Summary: A range of potential commercial applications of cloning and genetic modification in cattle have been suggested over the last decade. They include the rapid multiplication of elite genotypes, production of valuable human proteins, altered production characteristics, increased disease resistance and milk with improved nutritional value and processing capabilities. However, an economic return from the sale of product is far from reality in any of these areas. One impediment to achieving economic sustainability is the extremely low efficiency in producing healthy offspring from transferred cloned embryos due to embryonic, foetal and postnatal losses. Other significant impediments are society concerns surrounding such technologies, animal welfare issues, and regulatory requirements. This review will focus on current biological limitations and technical capabilities in commercial settings, the changes required to allow the production and sale of products at economically sustainable levels, cryopreservation and the progress towards automation of cloning techniques.

Technical Abstract: A range of potential commercial applications of cloning and genetic modification in cattle have been suggested over the last decade. They include the rapid multiplication of elite genotypes, production of valuable human proteins, altered production characteristics, increased disease resistance and milk with improved nutritional value and processing capabilities. However, an economic return from the sale of product is far from reality in any of these areas. One impediment to achieving economic sustainability is the extremely low efficiency in producing healthy offspring from transferred cloned embryos due to embryonic, foetal and postnatal losses. Other significant impediments are society concerns surrounding such technologies, animal welfare issues, and regulatory requirements. This review will focus on current biological limitations and technical capabilities in commercial settings, the changes required to allow the production and sale of products at economically sustainable levels, cryopreservation and the progress towards automation of cloning techniques.

Last Modified: 8/24/2016
Footer Content Back to Top of Page