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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Logan, Utah » Poisonous Plant Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #153146

Title: TREMORGENIC SYNDROME IN GOATS CAUSED BY IPOMOEA ASARIFOLIA IN NORTHEASTERN BRAZIL

Author
item MEDEIROS, R.M.T.
item BARBOSA, R
item RIET-CORREA, F
item LIMA, E
item TABOSA, I
item DE BARROS, S
item Gardner, Dale
item Molyneux, Russell

Submitted to: Toxicon
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/13/2003
Publication Date: 7/1/2003
Citation: MEDEIROS, R., BARBOSA, R.C., RIET-CORREA, F., LIMA, E.F., TABOSA, I.M., DE BARROS, S.S., GARDNER, D.R., MOLYNEUX, R. TREMORGENIC SYNDROME IN GOATS CAUSED BY IPOMOEA ASARIFOLIA IN NORTHEASTERN BRAZIL. TOXICON. 2003.

Interpretive Summary: Ipomoea asarifolia, commonly called salsa, is a toxic plant in Northeastern Brazil, affecting goats, sheep and cattle. The objectives of the study were to describe the clinical signs and pathology of the intoxication and to determine if the plant produces a lysosomal storage disease similar to that of locoweed intoxication. Fresh green leaves of the plant were collected and fed to ten different goats at different dosage levels (0 - 37 g/kg bw daily). Goats receiving greater than 5 g/kg plant showed clinical signs characteristic of tremorgenic syndrome (mild depression, slight tremors of the muscles of the head, neck and head nodding with signs more apparent after exercise). No significant lesions ere observed at necropsies or after histological and ultrastructural examination. The plant material was negative for toxic calystegines and contained only a very small amount of swainsonine (<0.001%). It was concluded that I. asarifolia causes a tremorgenic syndrome and the toxin is unknown.

Technical Abstract: Green leaves of Ipomoea asarifolia were dosed to 10 goats. Nine goats ingesting 5-37 g/kg bw daily had clinical signs in 4-38 days. One goat ingesting 2.5 g/kg bw daily during 125 days and two control goats had no clinical signs. Clinical signs were characteristic for a tremorgenic syndrome. Five goats recovered in 4-9 days after the withdrawal of the plant. Two goats died spontaneously and three were euthanased for histologic and ultrastructural studies. No significant lesions were observed at necropsies or on the histologic and ultrastructural studies. Samples of the plant analyzed for enzymatic inhibitors were negative for calystegines and contained an almost undetectable amount of swainsonine (less than 0.001%). It is concluded that I asarifolia causes a tremorgenic syndrome due to unknown tremogenic phytotoxins or mycotoxins.