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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Ames, Iowa » National Animal Disease Center » Food Safety and Enteric Pathogens Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #150504

Title: SMALL INTESTINAL INTUSSUSCEPTION ASSOCIATED WITH CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI INFECTION IN A RACCOON

Author
item Hamir, Amirali
item SONN, R
item Franklin, Sharon
item Wesley, Irene

Submitted to: Campylobacter Helicobacter and Related Organisms International Workshop
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/16/2003
Publication Date: 9/6/2003
Citation: HAMIR, A.N., SONN, R.J., FRANKLIN, S.L., WESLEY, I.V. SMALL INTESTINAL INTUSSUSCEPTION ASSOCIATED WITH CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI INFECTION IN A RACCOON. CAMPYLOBACTER HELICOBACTER AND RELATED ORGANISMS INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP. 2003. ABSTRACT P. 55.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Intussusception involves telescoping of proximal segment of intestine into an outer sheath formed by another segment of gut. Gross and histopathological findings of intestinal intussusception associated with Campylobacter jejuni are described in a female raccoon (Procyon lotor) kit. Gross changes consisted of small intestinal intussusception and presence of soft dark feces in the rectum. Microscopic lesions were confined to the intussuscepted area of the small intestines where the villi appeared blunted, cellular debris was present in some of the intestinal crypts, and the lamina propria was diffusely infiltrated with neutrophils. Bacteriologic examination of feces revealed heavy growth of C. jejuni. To our knowledge, intestinal intussusception has not previously been documented in this species. Although C. jejuni is a common resident in the intestinal tracts of domestic and wild mammals and birds, it has not previously been reported from raccoons. Bacteriologic examination of a small population of adult healthy raccoons in central Iowa (n = 11) revealed a 36% prevalence rate for C. jejuni. In addition, Arcobacter spp. was detected in four of ten animals (40%). This constitutes the first report of C. jejuni and Arcobacter spp. from raccoons.