Skip to main content
ARS Home » Midwest Area » Ames, Iowa » National Animal Disease Center » Food Safety and Enteric Pathogens Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #150500

Title: RECOVERY OF ARCOBACTER SPP. FROM EXOTIC ANIMAL SPECIES

Author
item Wesley, Irene
item SCHROEDER-TUCKER, L
item Franklin, Sharon

Submitted to: Campylobacter Helicobacter and Related Organisms International Workshop
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/6/2003
Publication Date: 9/6/2003
Citation: WESLEY, I.V., SCHROEDER-TUCKER, L., FRANKLIN, S.L. RECOVERY OF ARCOBACTER SPP. FROM EXOTIC ANIMAL SPECIES. CAMPYLOBACTER HELICOBACTER AND RELATED ORGANISMS INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP. 2003. ABSTRACT P. 54.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The genus Arcobacter encompasses Campylobacter-like organisms which grow in aerobic environments at 25 deg C. We have previously reported the isolation of Arcobacter from hogs, aborted porcine fetuses, dairy cattle, laying hens, poultry meat, and from well water associated with an outbreak of diarrhea at a youth summer camp. Our most recent report of Arcobacter species from raccoons in Iowa prompted a review of Arcobacter isolated and characterized by our laboratories from nondomesticated animals. Nearly 20 cases associated with exotic species have been submitted to our laboratories since 1993. The initial submissions requested either identification of Leptospira, which necessitated culture on P-80, which was the media initially used for identifying aerotolerant Campylobacter, or Campylobacter isolation to rule out C. fetus. In our laboratories, speciation was based initially on aerotolerance, growth at 25 deg C, and biochemical profiles. A multiplex PCR, which identified A. butzleri and by default A. cryaerophilus, has been subsequently used for confirmation. Cases occurring in a Galapagos turtle, white rhinoceros, a gazelle, rhea, alpaca, and male gorilla are highlighted. Clinical presentation and outcomes are presented. Taken together these data suggest that Arcobacter may be a true pathogen, which has been unrecognized in exotic animals. Alternatively, it may reside as a commensal, which is coincidentally isolated in the absence of other established pathogens.