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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Little Rock, Arkansas » Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #140515

Title: ESTIMATING DIETARY INTAKE OF ANTIOXIDANTS FROM OATS AND OTHER GRAINS

Author
item KEAST, SAMUEL
item Prior, Ronald

Submitted to: American College of Nutrition
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/15/2002
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Several large studies have shown that individuals who consume high quantities of whole grain cereals have significantly lower coronary heart disease. High intakes of whole grains, fruits and vegetables have also been associated with lower risk of some cancers. Breakfast cereals are a common component of the diet of children as well as adults. However, for adults, the mean intakes of whole grains are only 1.2 servings/day compared to 6.4 servings/day of total grains. Only 13.5% of US adults meet the Healthy People 2010 goal of 3 servings/day of whole grains. Whole grains contain numerous compounds that possess antioxidant activity, which are not present in highly refined grains. Whole grain oat and wheat-based cereals/food products on average have higher antioxidant contents than corn or rice based food products. The objective of this study was to determine the dietary intake of grain antioxidants in the US adult diet, using national intake data, with a focus on oats, using emerging data on the content of antioxidants in oats and key grain based foods. The USDA databases were used to identify key food products and estimate intakes from products containing oats which include oatmeal, oat bran, oat flour, cookies, breads, granolas and some snack foods. The antioxidant content in a typical serving of a whole grain and/or high fiber breakfast cereal is equivalent to or greater than a typical serving of vegetables. A diet especially high in whole grains can be a rich source of antioxidants with potential health benefits.

Technical Abstract: Several large cohort studies have shown that subjects with high consumption of whole grain cereals have significantly lower coronary heart disease. High intakes of whole grain, fruits and vegetables have also been associated with lower risk of some cancers. Apart from dietary fiber, whole grains also have numerous compounds that possess antioxidant activity such as, phenols, phenolic acids, flavonoids, tocols, phytic acid, ascorbic acid and sterols. Oats have been studied most extensively and whole grain oat and wheat-based cereals/food products on average have higher antioxidant contents than corn or rice based food products. The objective of this study was to determine the dietary intake of grain antioxidants in the US adult diet, using national intake data, with a focus on oats, using emerging data on the content of antioxidants in oats and key grain based foods. The USDA databases were used to identify key food products and estimate intakes from products containing oats which include oatmeal, oat bran, oat flour, cookies, breads, granolas and some snack foods. The antioxidant content in a typical serving of a whole grain and/or high fiber breakfast cereal is 500-1000 umol TE (trolox equivalents) of ORAC. And, the total phenolic content is about 100-500 ug per gram of cereal. For adults 40+y, the mean intakes of whole grains are 1.2 servings/d compared to 6.4 servings/day of total grains. Only 13.5% of US adults 40+y meet the Healthy People 2010 goal of 3 serv/d of whole grains. A diet especially high in whole grains, can be a rich source of antioxidants with potential health benefits.