Skip to main content
ARS Home » Midwest Area » Columbia, Missouri » Cropping Systems and Water Quality Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #137578

Title: PRECISION AGRICULTURE MASTERS PROGRAM - EDUCATING MISSOURI CROP PRODUCERS ABOUT THE BENEFITS OF PRECISION AGRICULTURE MANAGEMENT THROUGH ON-FARM RESEARCH

Author
item SHANNON, KENT
item DAVIS, GLENN
item Sudduth, Kenneth - Ken
item WIEBOLD, WILLIAM

Submitted to: ASAE Annual International Meeting
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/31/2002
Publication Date: 7/31/2002
Citation: SHANNON, K.D., DAVIS, G.J., SUDDUTH, K.A., WIEBOLD, W.J. PRECISION AGRICULTURE MASTERS PROGRAM - EDUCATING MISSOURI CROP PRODUCERS ABOUT THE BENEFITS OF PRECISION AGRICULTURE MANAGEMENT THROUGH ON-FARM RESEARCH. ASAE ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL MEETING. 2002. AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS. PAPER NO. 021016.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The Precision Agriculture Masters (PAM) Program was initiated to enhance the transfer of technology related to precision agriculture to Missouri's crop producers. The PAM program consists of three parts: the precision agriculture knowledge network available through the Missouri Precision Agriculture Center (MPAC), a research/demonstration program, and a neighbor-to-neighbor program. Precision agriculture masters (PAMs) are crop producers with some experience in precision agriculture and who are interested in enhancing their understanding of precision agriculture and how it can be incorporated into their crop management systems through on-farm research and demonstrations. Producers enrolled in the program are obtaining useful information that is allowing them to make management decisions. In addition, the PAMs themselves are taking the initiative to educate their neighbors in a number of ways. The biggest success to date, both economically and in terms of numbers of producers involved, has been the educational program that has helped farmers who had yield monitors without GPS to add "low-cost" GPS receivers to their systems, allowing them to collect yield maps.