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Title: CORN OIL: COMPOSITION, PROCESSING, AND UTILIZATION

Author
item ORTHOEFER, FRANK
item EASTMAN, JENNIFER
item List, Gary

Submitted to: Corn Oil
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/20/2002
Publication Date: 3/20/2003
Citation: ORTHOEFER, F., EASTMAN, J., LIST, G.R. CORN OIL: COMPOSITION, PROCESSING, AND UTILIZATION. White, P., Johnson, L.A. Association of American Cereal Chemists. St. Paul, MN. Corn Oil. 2003. p. 671-693.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Among the edible vegetable oils in the marketplace, corn oil is a minor oil, since it constitutes only about 3.4% of the 1998/99 U.S. vegetable oil production used in edible products. The U.S. vegetable oil market is dominated by soybean oil, which amounted to 87.9% of the 1998/99 production. The other edible vegetable oils produced in the United States are rapeseed, cottonseed, peanut, and sunflower with 3.3, 3.2, 1.3, and 0.9% of the market, respectively. Worldwide, the major oils are rape, olive, cocoa, palm and palm kernel, peanut, and sunflower. Nevertheless, corn oil is an important food oil because of its positive image with both the user and the consumer. Corn oil's high polyunsaturated fatty acid content, which has been widely publicized, has important nutritional and health benefits. Desirable flavor and the oxidative stability of corn oil during use in combination with its lack of precipitation under refrigeration have contributed to its market demand. All but a minor fraction (<5%) is used in foods; the largest single use is bottled oil, followed by margarine and industrial snack-frying operations.