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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pendleton, Oregon » Columbia Plateau Conservation Research Center » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #129529

Title: TILLAGE EFFECTS ON SOIL CARBON IN PACIFIC NORTHWEST DRYLAND CEREAL PRODUCTION

Author
item BEZDICEK, D
item FAUCI, MARY
item Albrecht, Stephan
item Skirvin, Katherine

Submitted to: Agronomy Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/1/2001
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Changes in crop management can induce substantial changes in soil physical, chemical and biological properties. Total soil C, C respiration and C pools were compared at long term conventional and direct seed sites in Oregon and Washington. Highest soil respiration rates were observed in the 0-5 cm depth in direct seed systems and a permanent pasture, with the magnitude of the respiration dependent on the number of years in a management system. Soil respiration from conventional tillage was more evenly distributed in the soil profile, and could be greater at the lower depths in some instances. Long-term direct seed wheat systems had similar soil respiration rates as permanent pasture. Most systems exhibited three or four distinct changes in respiration rates during the 365-day incubation period, suggesting kinetically distinct carbon pools. These observations support the conclusion that conventional tillage accelerates carbon loss from soil, while direct seeding and pasture sequester atmospheric carbon.