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Title: INFLUENCE OF IONIC STRENGTH IN THE RHIZOSPHERE ON PRODUCTIVITY AND NUTRITIVE VALUE OF CHICORY

Author
item Neel, James - Jim
item Alloush, Ghiath
item Belesky, David
item Clapham, William

Submitted to: American Society of Agronomy Meetings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/14/2001
Publication Date: 10/21/2001
Citation: Neel, J.P., Alloush, G.A., Belesky, D.P., Clapham, W.M. 2001. Influence of ionic strength in the rhizosphere on productivity and nutritive value of chicory. CD-ROM. Annual Meeting Abstracts. ASA-CSSA-SSSA October, Charlotte, NC> Abstract No. c03-belesky120150-P.PDF.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Localized patches of high ionic strength (IS) can occur with manure deposition in pasture and influence plant production, sward composition and nutritive value. Plants that tolerate IS challenges could help stabilize pasture production. Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) appears to thrive in high nutrient input situations, but no information is available on chicory response to increasing IS. We conducted a greenhouse experiment to evaluate the effect of rhizosphere ionic strength (0.9, 4.0, 8.0, and 12.0 dS per meter) on the productivity and nutritive value of chicory. Dry matter decreased linearly as IS increased. Shoot mineral concentrations for Ca, Na and Cl increased as IS increased. In vitro organic matter disappearance increased and nitrate-N decreased as IS increased. At higher IS, nitrate-N and K exceeded maximum recommended amounts for ruminant diets. Sodium was well below the maximum tolerable level for ruminants, but could be high enough to influence dry matter intake at the highest IS level. Nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC) contents in shoots and roots increased with time. Increasing IS did not impede the accumulation of NSC in roots but did so in shoots. Nitrogen and energy were not limiting from an animal production standpoint at any IS level. Chicory as a component of a forage mixture could help stabilize forage yield in pastures with localized or general high IS patches arising from nutrient inputs.