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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Parlier, California » San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center » Water Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #120437

Title: MORPHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF YOUNG ROOTS IN SIZE-CONTROLING PEACH ROOTSTOCKS

Author
item SALSMAN, MICHELLE
item Bryla, David
item DEJONG, THEODORE

Submitted to: American Society of Horticulture Science Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/22/2001
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Root morphology influences a plant's ability to acquire water and nutrients from the soil environment. The purpose of this study was to examine variation in morphology of young roots from five different rootstocks - one standard rootstock (Nemagaurd) and four size- controlling rootstocks (K119-50, P30-135, Hiawatha, and K146-43) - grafted to 5-year-old Loadel peach trees. The relative effect of each rootstock on canopy volume was as follows: Nemagaurd >> K119-50 P30-135 > Hiawatha >> K146-43. Root in-growth containers filled with soil were buried near the base of the trees for 4 weeks. Roots were then collected from the containers, and length, diameter and tissue density of the fine roots were measured. Root growth rates differed considerably among the rootstocks, ranging from 0.028 to 0.091 cm cm-3 soil wk-1. Mean root diameters also varied from 0.41 to 0.62 mm and tissue density varied from 130 to 190 mg dry weight cm-3 root. In general, rootstocks with the largest mean diameters and the most rapid root growth (i.e., Nemagaurd and K146-43) had the lowest root tissue density, while those with the smallest mean diameters and slowest root growth (i.e., Hiawatha and P30-135) had the highest root tissue density. Root characteristics, however, were not correlated to size-controlling characteristics of the rootstocks. It is apparent that the rootstocks will vary in the total amount of carbon expended on individual root growth; e.g., rootstocks with thinner roots or roots with low tissue density will require less carbon per unit root length than rootstocks with coarser roots or roots with high root tissue density.