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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Ithaca, New York » Robert W. Holley Center for Agriculture & Health » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #115504

Title: ACCOUNTING FOR RUMINAL DEFICIENCIES OF NITROGEN AND BRANCHED-CHAIN AMINO ACIDS IN THE STRUCTURE OF THE CORNELL NET CARBOHYDRATE AND PROTEIN SYSTEM

Author
item TEDESCHI, L
item FOX, D
item Russell, James

Submitted to: Cornell Nutrition Conference for Feed Manufacturers
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/22/2000
Publication Date: 12/22/2000
Citation: TEDESCHI, L.O., FOX, D.G., RUSSELL, J.B. ACCOUNTING FOR RUMINAL DEFICIENCIES OF NITROGEN AND BRANCHED-CHAIN AMINO ACIDS IN THE STRUCTURE OF THE CORNELL NET CARBOHYDRATE AND PROTEIN SYSTEM. CORNELL NUTRITION CONFERENCE FOR FEED MANUFACTURERS. 2000.

Interpretive Summary: In ruminant animals, feedstuffs are digested in the rumen prior to gastric and intestinal digestion, and the animal is dependent on fermentation products for its nutrition. The rumen submodel of the Cornell Net Carbohydrate Protein System (CNCPS) has equations that predict the end-products of ruminal fermentation, and this submodel has allowed farmers sto better predict animal performance from diet. Previous versions of the CNCPS did not have equations to accounted for nitrogen or branched chain volatile fatty acid deficiencies. The newest version of the CNCPS has been modified so these limitations can be accommodated, and its ability to predict animal performance has been improved. The CNCPS allows farmers to design cheaper and more nutritious rations for cattle.

Technical Abstract: The Cornell Net Carbohydrate Protein System (CNCPS) rumen submodel was modified to include equations to account for a ruminal N-deficiency, and the ability of the CNCPS to predict average daily gain in growing/finishing steers was significantly improved. Data for lactating dairy cows was lacking, but we are currently conducting a lactation trail to valid these modifications. Preliminary work indicates that the model can also be improved by accounting for BCVFA and BCAA deficiencies. BCVFA deficiencies are less common than N-deficiencies, but they can have a significant impact on animal performance if the diet is primarily forage.