Skip to main content
ARS Home » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #110731

Title: A TRIVALENT VACCINE FOR THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS MASTITIS.

Author
item Guidry, Albert
item SEARS, P
item FATTOM, A
item SHEPHERD, S
item OBRIEN, C

Submitted to: American Dairy Science Association Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/20/2000
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Previous studies reported that immunization of cows with an autogenous Staphylococcus aureus vaccine followed by antibiotic treatment cured 65% of quarters chronically infected with S. aureus. The current study was conducted in a similar manner using a trivalent vaccine (Nabi) that contained S. aureus serotypes CP5, CP8, and 336, which account for 100% of S. aureus serotypes present in dairy herds in the United States and 96% of the serotypes present in European dairy herds. The vaccines contained either a killed autogenous S. aureus or the trivalent organisms in combination with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant, Selenium/Vit.E, and Vital E (Schering-Plough, Kenilworth, NJ). Cows diagnosed as having chronic S. aureus intramammary infections received three subcutaneous inoculations in the region of the supramammary lymph node at 0, 14 and 21 days after diagnosis of S. aureus intramammary infection. Cows also received six intramammary infusions of antibiotic at 1 to 2-day intervals beginning on day 14 after diagnosis of intramammary infection. Antibiotics alone cleared 1of 23 infected quarters (4%) and 0 of 12 cows (0%). The autogenous vaccine + antibiotic cleared 25 of 42 quarters (60%) and 11 of 20 cows (55%). The trivalent vaccine + antibiotic cleared 16 of 21 quarters (76%) and 7 of 13 cows (60%). The data suggest that the "universal" trivalent vaccine is as effective as autogenous vaccines. This would allow for treatment of cows chronically infected with S. arueus without the necessity of preparing a herd-specific vaccine, thus preventing culling of valuable animals. Studies are under way using the trivalent vaccine for the prevention of S. aureus intramammary infections.