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Title: NEMATUS OLIGOSPILUS FORSTER (HYMENOPTERA: TENTHREDINIDAE), AN INTRODUCED WILLOW SAWFLY IN THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE.

Author
item Koch, Frank
item Smith, David R

Submitted to: Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/17/1999
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Sawflies or plant wasps are members of the plant-feeding insect complex that causes millions of dollars of damage each year to agricultural crops, forests, and ornamental plantings. One species has been accidentally introduced into Argentina, Chile, South Africa, Lesotho, and New Zealand. It is destructive to willows and poplars, important plants in these countries for shade trees, river and streambank protection, and hill country erosion control. The species introduced into all Southern Hemisphere localities is determined to be the same, and, based on examination of authentically identified specimens from Europe, its identity is confirmed as a European species. The species is described, and the hosts and distribution in the Southern Hemisphere are given. The identity and distribution of this species is important to scientists interested in searching for possible biological control agents and to authorities at ports-of-entry in the United States and southern hemisphere countries to possibly prevent its spread elsewhere.

Technical Abstract: Nematus oligospilus Forster is an adventive sawfly in Argentina, Chile, South Africa, Lesotho, and New Zealand where it is destructive to willows and poplars. The species is redescribed from types from Europe and compared with the Southern Hemisphere specimens. A lectotype is designated. Nematus desantisi Smith, described from Argentina, is a new synonym of Nematus oligospilus. Recorded hosts and distribution in the Southern Hemisphere are given.