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ARS Home » Midwest Area » East Lansing, Michigan » Sugarbeet and Bean Research » Research » Research Project #437047

Research Project: Wild Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Disease Resistance and Adaptive Root Traits

Location: Sugarbeet and Bean Research

Project Number: 5050-21430-011-13-S
Project Type: Non-Assistance Cooperative Agreement

Start Date: Sep 1, 2019
End Date: Aug 31, 2021

Objective:
1. Characterize wild P. vulgaris disease response to anthracnose, BCMV, and root rot. 2. Characterize wild P. vulgaris root phenotypes.

Approach:
Characterize wild P. vulgaris disease response to anthracnose, BCMV, and root rot. 1) Anthracnose: Anthracnose screening will be done using the method described by Zuiderveen et al. (2016). All the wild bean accessions available (n = 241) will be tested for their reaction to 4 anthracnose races: 55, 109, 2047, and 3481 (based on standard race nomenclature). By screening wild bean accessions with the most virulent C. lindemuthianum races available, we will increase the likelihood of identifying novel sources of disease resistance. All available lines will be evaluated in replicate, and anthracnose disease response data will be tabulated in datasheets. 2) Bean Common mosaic virus: All the wild bean accessions will be screened for BCMV resistance using strain NL-3. All available lines will be evaluated in replicate, and BCMV disease response data will be tabulated in a datasheet. 3) Root rot: Wild bean accessions will be inoculated with Fusarium solani and evaluated at 14 days post germination. Fusarium root rot is evaluated using an established scale from 1 (healthy, no lesions) to 9 (complete plant death) according to previous study. All available lines will be evaluated in replicate. Characterize wild P. vulgaris root phenotypes. All available wild bean accessions will be grown using a staggered planting method over the course of 4 months. Seeds will be planted in a vermiculite medium for easy root washing. At the V1 stage (expanded first trifoliate, ~2 weeks of growth), roots will be imaged with a scanner and then the dry biomass weighed. Image analysis of shoot and root scans will be done using a well-established pipeline that is currently in use by our lab. Measured/calculated root phenotypes include, but are not limited to, basal root number, width, length; taproot width, length; lateral root density, fibrosity, primary root branching number, internode length, etc.