Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research » Research » Research Project #436826

Research Project: Movement of Salmonella spp. Throughout Poultry Production and Control Strategies

Location: Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research

Project Number: 6040-32000-069-01-S
Project Type: Non-Assistance Cooperative Agreement

Start Date: Sep 1, 2019
End Date: Aug 31, 2021

Objective:
(1) To verify the movement of Salmonella within the poultry house other than by the fecal oral route and its persistence in the environment. (2) To determine the presence and persistence of Salmonella outside the poultry house.

Approach:
The research addressed under Objective 1 will attempt to verify the movement of Salmonella within the poultry house other than by the fecal oral route and its persistence in the environment. One mode of Salmonella spread is through the air by means of dust. With the large volumes of air being moved in modern poultry house there is strong evidence that Salmonella can be transported throughout the house by dust and that inhalation or entry through the eye is sufficient for causing Salmonella colonization in broilers. Insects are known to be mechanical vectors for movement of and spread of microorganisms like Salmonella. However little research has been performed as to the prevalence and survivability as well as infectious dose of Salmonella contaminated litter beetles and flies. The most obvious and important source of Salmonella spread and persistence will be studied, that being the litter. Several studies have looked at the presence of Salmonella in litter, but to date the age and condition of the litter as well as how it is managed during and after the flock has been marketed has not been well studied. The presence and persistence of Salmonella outside the poultry house will be addressed under Objective 2. The main sources of spread outside the poultry house is when contaminated litter is removed, stored and then eventually used, typically as fertilizer. Under this objective the persistence of Salmonella in litter while it is stored will be determined. Additionally, insects will be monitored to determine if they are spreading Salmonella into the environment. Once the litter has been land applied surveillance of the environment and the possible uptake of Salmonella by livestock will be monitored.