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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Kearneysville, West Virginia » Appalachian Fruit Research Laboratory » Innovative Fruit Production, Improvement, and Protection » Research » Research Project #431716

Research Project: Integrating Tactics for Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Management in Commercial Orchards

Location: Innovative Fruit Production, Improvement, and Protection

Project Number: 8080-21000-024-60-S
Project Type: Non-Assistance Cooperative Agreement

Start Date: Sep 1, 2016
End Date: Aug 31, 2021

Objective:
The objectives for this project will be to: 1) refine monitoring traps for the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) in commercial orchards; 2) assess the impact of native and exotic natural enemies against BMSB in orchard border areas; and 3) establish relationships among key biotic and abiotic factors to predict population pressure in orchards.

Approach:
Objective 1: Potential grower-friendly trap designs for BMSB will be evaluated in commercial orchards. BMSB capture rate in traps will be compared among alternative trap types, including but not limited to sticky card, modified small pyramid, and standard black pyramid traps. Traps will be baited with a pheromone+ synergist lure. Those traps that yield capture data that correlate with standard pyramid traps will then be assessed for their ability to trigger trap-based threshold treatments for either full-block, ARM, or border spray treatments. Objective 2: We will assess the impact of native and exotic natural enemies against BMSB in orchard border areas. Sentinel egg masses will be deployed in favored wild hosts of BMSB such as tree of heaven to assess parasitism and predation rates. Vertical transect techniques including pulley systems and fogging within tree canopies of wild hosts will be used to assess predator and parasite activity throughout the season. Alternative techniques to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of monitoring the spread and growth of populations of the adventive parasitoid of BMSB eggs, Trissolcus japonicus, in the Mid-Atlantic region and for monitoring and measuring its impact on BMSB populations will be evaluated. These will include but not necessarily be limited to visual sticky traps, baiting host trees with the BMSB aggregation pheromone to promote concentrated egg-laying in accessible portions of tree canopies, and potentially the use of kairomones associated with BMSB egg masses. Objective 3: We will establish relationships among key biotic and abiotic factors to predict population pressure in orchards. We will utilize existing protocols to assess annual changes in BMSB populations. Key biotic and abiotic variables that will be measured each year will include counts of the numbers of adults seeking overwintering sites, environmental conditions during winter, spring and summer, the survivorship of overwintering adults, seasonal captures in pheromone traps, and rates of predation and parasitism. By collecting these data over multiple seasons and at multiple sites using the same sites each year, we will establish the relationships between these variables and their ability to model and predict BMSB population density annually as a risk mitigation tool for stakeholders.