Skip to main content
ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Davis, California » Crops Pathology and Genetics Research » Research » Research Project #431696

Research Project: Early-detection and Monitoring of Abiotic and Biotic Stress in Production Environments

Location: Crops Pathology and Genetics Research

Project Number: 2032-21220-007-17-S
Project Type: Non-Assistance Cooperative Agreement

Start Date: Sep 1, 2018
End Date: Aug 31, 2021

Objective:
The overall goal is to conduct research that can lead to development of commercially viable solutions advanced robotics and imaging technologies to enhance the productivity and sustainability of pest management in ornamental crops. This program will focus on the following objectives: Objective 1: Maximize repeatability of reflectance data acquired with hyperspectral imagers mounted on: 1. aerial drones, and 2. in side greenhouses. Objective 2: Identify leaf reflectance traits uniquely associated with different biotic stressors. Objective 3. Detection and management of crop stresses associated with abiotic and biotic stressors using proximal remote sensing techniques for key ornamental crops. Objective 4: Processing of reflectance data acquired with hyperspectral imagers into user-friendly maps and decision support tools.

Approach:
This proposal to FNRI is for year 1 and will address objectives 1 and 2. Activities will complement and synergize with floriculture projects being conducted by ARS scientists in the Crops Pathology and Genetics Research unit. Objective 1: Maximize repeatability of reflectance data acquired with hyperspectral imagers mounted on; 1. aerial drones and 2. inside greenhouses. Perform experimental testing of imaging at night time with artificial lighting under greenhouse conditions. Perform experimental testing of different calibration methods to minimize the noise associated with reflectance data due to changes in sunlight intensity, projection angle, atmospheric composition, and cloud cover. Objective 2: Identify leaf reflectance traits uniquely associated with different biotic stressors. Using a rail-based imaging system, acquire hyperspectral images from ornamental plants experimentally infested with different arthropod pests and characterize plant reflectance responses to these biotic stressors. In addition, Nansen and his team will also conduct the following activity in year 1 at commercial ornamental production systems. Using a drone-mounted imaging system, acquire hyperspectral images from ornamental plants at locations with identified infestations of arthropod pests and characterize plant reflectance responses to these biotic stressors.