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ARS Home » Southeast Area » New Orleans, Louisiana » Southern Regional Research Center » Cotton Fiber Bioscience Research » Research » Research Project #435004

Research Project: Molecular Characterization and Phenotypic Assessments of Cotton Fiber Quality Traits

Location: Cotton Fiber Bioscience Research

Project Number: 6054-21000-018-00-D
Project Type: In-House Appropriated

Start Date: May 29, 2018
End Date: May 28, 2023

Objective:
1. Use genome-wide association analysis to identify genes and molecular markers that are positively associated with cotton fiber quality and yield traits, and work with breeders to evaluate their effectiveness for simultaneous improvement of fiber quality and yield in diverse genetic backgrounds. 1.A. Use genome-wide association analysis to identify genes and molecular markers that are associated with cotton fiber quality and yield trait QTL. 1.B. Validate the stability and transferability of fiber QTL in diverse genetic backgrounds and work with breeders to evaluate their effectiveness for simultaneous improvement of fiber quality and yield. 2. Use short fiber mutants to evaluate cotton fiber elongation to discover and characterize biochemical pathways and genes controlling fiber elongation. 3. Use cotton mutants to determine impacts of genes and environment on cotton fiber maturity and fineness.

Approach:
Fiber quality and yield are controlled by multiple genes that physically reside on chromosomes. Re-sequencing the genomes of a population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) that differ in fiber quality and yield will identify genes or genomic regions controlling these traits. Fiber quality is controlled by genes that physically reside on chromosomes. Selection of DNA markers physically adjacent to the superior alleles of these genes will enable breeders to more efficiently and effectively breed a cotton genotype with improved fiber quality. Genes, by way of their products such as transcripts or proteins, affect fiber development and physical properties. Therefore, manipulation of these genes or their products will alter fiber development. Biological processes affecting fiber maturity and fineness are regulated by genes, and are significantly affected by environmental factors. Manipulation of these genes will alter fiber maturity and fineness and may reduce the influence of environmental factors.