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Jerry Uyemoto

Biological Science Collaborator


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University of California, Davis

Hutchison Hall

Davis, CA 95616



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Research Program:

Dr. Uyemoto's research focuses on the etiology and biology of grapevine virus diseases including virus characterization and development of assays and control. Dr. Uyemoto has projects with stone fruits on almond leaf scorch incitant Xylella fastidiosa; necrotic union of pluot trees (cause unknown); and stunt of Tieton sweet cherry trees (cause unknown). With grapevines, new viruses are detected using a differential set of hybrid rootstocks. In addition, new stem markings attributed to graft-transmissible pathogens are being investigated. All are lethal conditions. 

Biography:

Dr. Jerry K. Uyemoto, Research Plant Pathologist, with the USDA-ARS, Crops Pathology and Genetics Research Unit in Davis, California, retired on March 31, 2007, after working for 20.5 years in the field of Etiology and biology of grapevine virus diseases including virus characterization, development of assays and control.


Dr. Uyemoto received a B.S. in Agronomy in 1962; a M.S. in Plant Pathology in 1964; and a Ph.D. in Plant Pathology from the University of California at Davis. Dr. Uyemoto went on to Assistant and Associate Professor positions at Cornell University, Geneva, NY working on virus diseases of stone, pome, and grape research from 1968 through 1977. Dr. Uyemoto served on the faculty of Kansas State University in Manhattan as an Associate and Full Professor from 1978 to 1982, where he conducted research on virus diseases of corn, sorghum and wheat. He became a Senior Scientist for Advanced Genetic Sciences Inc. in 1982 through 1984 working on tissue and protoplast culture of guar. Dr. Uyemoto then returned to the University of California at Davis to serve as a visiting scientist performing research on the Epicarp lesion of pistachio from 1984 through 1985 and X-disease of cherry from 1985 through 1986. In 1986 he joined the USDA, ARS, Crops Pathology and Genetics Research Unit in Davis, CA.