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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Dataset for What We Eat In America, NHANES (Survey-SR)
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The dataset, Survey-SR, provides the nutrient data for assessing dietary intakes from the national survey What We Eat In America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (WWEIA, NHANES). Historically, USDA databases have been used for national nutrition monitoring (1). Currently, the Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies (FNDDS) (2), is used by Food Surveys Research Group, ARS, to process dietary intake data from WWEIA, NHANES. Nutrient values for FNDDS are based on Survey-SR. Survey-SR was referred to as the "Primary Data Set" in older publications. Early versions of the dataset were composed mainly of commodity-type items such as wheat flour, sugar, milk, etc. However, with increased consumption of commercial processed and restaurant foods and changes in how national nutrition monitoring data are used (1), many commercial processed and restaurant items have been added to Survey-SR. 

 

The current version, Survey-SR 2013-2014is mainly based on the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (SR) 28 (2) and contains sixty-six nutrientseach for 3,404 foods. These nutrient data will be used for assessing intake data from WWEIA, NHANES 2013-2014. Nutrient profiles were added for 265 new foods and updated for about 500 foods from the version used for the previous survey (WWEIA, NHANES 2011-12).  New foods added include mainly commercially processed foods such as several gluten-free products, milk substitutes, sauces and condiments such as sriracha, pesto and wasabi, Greek yogurt, breakfast cereals, low-sodium meat products, whole grain pastas and baked products, and several beverages including bottled tea and coffee, coconut water, malt beverages, hard cider, fruit-flavored drinks, fortified fruit juices and fruit and/or vegetable smoothies. Several school lunch pizzas and chicken products, fast-food sandwiches, and new beef cuts were also added, as they are now reported more frequently by survey respondents. Nutrient profiles were updated for several commonly consumed foods such as cheddar, mozzarella and American cheese, ground beef, butter, and catsup. The changes in nutrient values may be due to reformulations in products, changes in the market shares of brands, or more accurate data. Examples of more accurate data include analytical data, market share data, and data from a nationally representative sample.

Survey-SR contains four files - Food Description, Nutrient Data, Nutrient Definition and Source Code. For details on file formats, click here, and for details on how the nutrient profiles are determined, please download SR documentation.

 

Suggested citation

US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Nutrient Data Laboratory. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Dataset for What We Eat In America, NHANES (Survey-SR), October 2015. Internet: /Services/docs.htm?docid=25662.

References:

1.     Ahuja JKC, Moshfegh AJ, Holden JM, Harris E. USDA food and nutrient databases provide the infrastructure forfood and nutrition research, policy, and practice.  Journal of Nutrition. 2013;143:241S-9S.http://jn.nutrition.org/content/143/2/241S.full

2.     U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 2014. USDA Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies 2011-2012. Food Surveys Research Group Home Page, /ARSUserFiles/80400530/pdf/fndds/fndds_2011_2012_doc.pdf 

3.     US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Nutrient Data Laboratory. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 28 Current: September 2015. Internet: /Services/docs.htm?docid=8964


Last Modified: 8/13/2016
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