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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

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World Dairy Expo 2016
Madison, WI – October 4 - 8, 2016

Invisible losses from corn silage piles and bunkers: Real “shrink” losses
Peter Robinson, Extension Dairy Nutrition and Management Specialist
University of California, Davis, CA

"It" doesn't just happen: What manure evaluation can tell us about cows and rations
Mary Beth Hall, Dairy Scientist
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, Madison, WI

Feeding reduced lignin alfalfa: How do we achieve the most from this new technology?
David Weakley, Director of Dairy Forage Nutrition Research
Forage Genetics International, Gray Summit, MO

What to look for when feeding this year's forage
John Goeser, Animal Nutrition Director
Rock River Laboratory, Watertown, WI

Selecting, establishing, and managing cover crops after corn silage
Heidi Johnson, Crops and Soils Agent
University of Wisconsin Extension, Dane County

Forage quality for high producing dairy herds: Key performance indicators
Randy Shaver, Extension Dairy Nutritionist
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Is it better for forages to be more digestible or to digest more quickly?
David Combs, Professor of Dairy Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison

2015 World Dairy Expo
Madison, WI - September 29 - October 3, 2015

How much forage can we feed to dairy cows?
Kenneth Kalscheur, Dairy Scientist
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, Madison, WI

Managing fermentation with baled silage 
Wayne Coblentz, Agronomist/Dairy Scientist
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, Marshfield, WI

Cows agree with total tract NDFD
David Combs, Professor of Dairy Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Forage systems for warm season dairying
Dennis Hancock, Forage Extension Specialist
University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Making or breaking rations with forage digestibility and quality
Mary Beth Hall, Dairy Scientist
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, Madison, WI

The secret life of rumen microbes
Paul Weimer, Research Microbiologist
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, Madison, WI

Managing reduced-lignin alfalfa 
Dan Undersander, Professor of Agronomy
University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

2014 World Dairy Expo
Madison, WI - September 30 - October 4, 2014

Making quality baleage with annual forages
Mike McCormick
Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Franklinton, LA

Using propionic acid to preserve more hay 
Wayne Coblentz
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, Marshfield, WI

Undigested NDF and updates to NDF digestibility: New tools in forage anlaysis
Mike Van Amburgh
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Make sure your kernel processor is doing its job
Kevin Shinners and Brian Luck
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Redesigning alfalfa for improved protein utilization: PPO and o-diphenols vs. tannins
John Grabber
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, Madison, WI

Manure on forage crops: Benefits and challenges
Bill Jokela
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, Madison, WI

Do higher seeding rates improve alfalfa stand persistence and yield? 
Dan Undersander
University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

2013 World Dairy Expo
Madison, WI - October 1-5, 2013

Differences in making alfalfa and grass silage
Dan Undersander, Research and Extension Agronomist
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Reducing heat damage in hay and haylage
Dan Undersander, Research and Extension Agronomist
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Using forage fiber analyses to get the most from your cows
Rick Grant, President
William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute

Have you kept pace with improved forage testing options?
Neal Martin, recently retired Center Director
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, USDA-ARS

Plastic covers and silage density: What's new and basic in making good silage?
Richard Muck, Agricultural Engineer
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, USDA-ARS

Using propionic acid to preserve more hay
Wayne Coblentz, Research Dairy Scientist/Agronomist
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, USDA-ARS

Corn silage yield drivers and profit robbers
Joe Lauer, Extension Agronomist
University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

2012 World Dairy Expo
Madison, WI l October 2-6, 2012

How low can you go with protein in dairy cattle diets?
Glen Broderick, Research Dairy Scientist
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, USDA-ARS

Corn silage quality varies from field to field
Joe Lauer, Professor of Agronomy
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Silage inoculants seem to affect animal performance as well as crop fermentation
Richard Muck, Agricultural Engineer
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, USDA-ARS

The economics of feeding dairy cattle with high-priced forage and grain
Steve Woodford, Dairy Nutrition Consultant
Nutrition Professionals

Using plant analysis to diagnose alfalfa nutrient needs
Carrie Laboski, Associate Professor and Extension Soil Scientist
University of Wisconsin-Madison

2011 World Dairy Expo
Madison, WI ? October 4-8, 2011

Improving forage harvest efficiency: More crop with less time and fuel
Matthew Digman, Agricultural Engineer
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, USDA-ARS

 

Corn silage, fermentation time, and starch digestibility: what makes it tick?
Patrick Hoffman, Dairy Scientist
University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Top producing herds in Wisconsin feed more forage than you may think

 

Randy Shaver, Extension Dairy Nutritionist

University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Fall-grown oat offers a unique forage option: High fiber digestibility and high energy

 

Wayne Coblentz, Agronomist/Dairy Scientist

U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, USDA-ARS

 

Minimize bunker/bag silage losses with a tight plastic seal and frequent inspection

 

Brian Holmes, Agricultural Engineer

University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Reducing greenhouse gases can also reduce food costs

 

Larry Chase, Extension Specialist in Dairy Nutrition

Cornell University

 

Capitalizing on forages to reduce purchases of high-priced corn and soybeans

 

Larry Chase, Extension Specialist in Dairy Nutrition

Cornell University

 

 
All presentations are in PDF format. Click here to download the free Adobe Reader, including web browser plug-in.

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2010 World Dairy Expo
Madison, WI ? Sept. 28 to Oct. 2, 2010

Growing Grasses for Dairy Rations

Geoffrey Brink, Agronomist

 

U.S. DairyForageResearchCenter, USDA-ARS

 

What do the real experts(cows) say about corn silage fiber analyses?

Dave Combs, Dairy Scientist

University of Wisconsin - Madison

 

Can alfalfa compete with corn silage in dairy rations?

Michael Hutjens, Extension Dairy Specialist

University of Illinois

 

A new way of looking at bunker silage density

Richard Muck, Agricultural Engineer

U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center, USDA-ARS

 

Wrapped baled silage

Kevin Shinners, Biological Sytems Engineer

University of Wisconsin - Madison

 

Factors affecting Relative Forage Quality (RFQ) in hay and haylage

Dan Undersander, Research and Extension Agronomist

University of Wisconsin - Madison

 

Rumen microbes: A cow's best friend

Paul Weimer, Microbiologist

U.S. DairyForageResearchCenter, USDA-ARS

 

All presentations are in PDF format. Click here to download the free Adobe Reader, including web browser plug-in.

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World Dairy Expo
Madison, WI ? September 29 - October 3, 2009

Using whole farm management of crop/livestock systems to reduce the phosphorus index

 

Tom Cox, Ag Economist and Soil Scientist

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Jim Leverich, On-Farm Research Coordinator

University of Wisconsin-Extension

 

Should a custom operator be harvesting your forages?

 

Matthew Digman, Machinery Systems Specialist

University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Finding a fair way to price standing hay and corn silage

 

Ted Bay , Crops and Farm Management Agent

University of Wisconsin-Extension, Grant and LafayetteCounties

 

Don't overlook the benefits of perennial forages for soils, crops, and water quality

 

Bill Jokela, Soil Scientist

U.S. DairyForageResearchCenter, USDA-ARS

 

Don't make your cows eat dirt: Reducing ash in hay and haylage

 

Dan Undersander, Research and Extension Agronomist

University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Using corn silage starch to navigate high-priced grain

 

Randy Shaver, Extension Dairy Nutritionist

University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

New understanding of the stories cows tell about nutrition

 

Mary Beth Hall, Dairy Scientist

U.S. DairyForageResearchCenter, USDA-ARS

 

 
All presentations are in PDF format. Click here to download the free Adobe Reader, including web browser plug-in.

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Getting More from Forages
Madison, WI ? July 29-30, 2009

Adjusting for forage variability via on-farm analysis
David Mertens, Dairy Scientist, U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center
Paolo Berzaghi, Associate Professor, University of Padua (Italy)

 

 

Modeling the rumen and beyond: A new approach
Michael Murphy, Animal Scientist, University of Illinois
Jim Russell, Microbiologist, U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center

 

 

Rumen microbes as agents of production variation in dairy cattle
Paul Weimer, Microbiologist
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center

 

 

Non-fiber carbohydrates: What sets the right quantity and quality for rations?
Mary Beth Hall , Dairy Scientist
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center

 

 

Accounting for protein degradability in the rumen
Glen Broderick, Dairy Scientist
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center

 

 

Traditional breeding and genetic modification
Neal Martin, Director
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center

 

 

Genetic selection to improve grasses and legumes for grazing
Michael Casler, Plant Geneticist
Heathcliffe Riday, Plant Geneticist
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center

 

 

Incorporating and managing superior forages in grazing-based dairy systems
Geoffrey Brink, Research Agronomist
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center

 

 

Improving protein utilization by ruminants with protein-binding polyphenols
John Grabber, Agronomist
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center

 

 

Breaking down cell walls via lignin modification
Ronald Hatfield, Plant Physiologist
Michael Sullivan, Molecular Geneticist
U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center

 

 
All presentations are in PDF format. Click here to download the free Adobe Reader, including web browser plug-in.
 
 

Last Modified: 10/17/2016
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