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National Program 104: Veterinary, Medical, and Urban Entomology
Action Plan
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Action Plan: National Program 104 - Veterinary, Medical, and Urban Entomology 2019-2024

Damage and disease associated with biting and stinging arthropods affect humans and livestock in the United States and around the world. Economic losses from arthropod damage, including crop losses, exceed one hundred billion dollars annually. Human globalization, international trade, local movement, and altered ecosystems facilitate the introduction of new disease vectors and pathogens into the United States, promote new parasitic arthropod-wildlife-livestock interactions, enable atypical arthropod vector-host-pathogen interactions, and expose humans to new vectors and pathogens. Research conducted for the National Program 104 seeks to reduce arthropod damage to animals, humans, and structures. This work will target (1) arthropods transmitting pathogens that cause diseases in humans and animals, (2) pests that directly harm human health by feeding or stinging, and (3) nesting pests that damage structures. Due to the interconnection between the health of animals, people, and the environment, the program employs a "One Health" approach, which is the collaborative effort of the human health, animal health and environmental health communities. Through this collaboration, USDA supports sustained health outcomes for both animals and people.

To read the entire Action Plan (pdf; 0.3Mb): 2019-2024

 

Action Plan: National Program 104 - Veterinary, Medical, and Urban Entomology 2014-2019

The mission of National Program 104 (NP 104), Veterinary, Medical, and Urban Entomology, is to improve human and food-animal well-being through development of effective and safe pest control methods. The emphasis of the program is on agriculture, with the goal of reducing the 12% loss experienced by American livestock production caused by insects and ticks. Research with agricultural benefit has implications for human health, both directly by reducing the risk of zoonotic diseases, and indirectly by developing methods that can be used to combat vectors of human pathogens.

To read the entire Action Plan (pdf; 0.5Mb): 2014-2019