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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Preliminary Investigations Regarding Inheritance of Resistance to the Sunflower Midge

Authors
item Miller, Jerry
item Charlet, Laurence
item Brewer, Gary - NDSU

Submitted to: Proceedings Sunflower Research Workshop
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 29, 1999
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: A major factor limiting sunflower production in the east-central area of North Dakota and western Minnesota has been the sunflower midge insect. For the past four years there has been a resurgence in the sunflower midge population, with a wider area affected than the previous large infestation of 1979 to 1981. There has been little information obtained regarding the relationship between inbred lines and their hybrids for resistance to the sunflower midge. Therefore, the objectives of this investigation were to observe the variability among inbred lines of sunflower and to observe the inheritance of resistance in hybrids resulting from crosses among those lines. There were significant differences among the inbred lines for midge resistance, and significant differences among hybrids created by crossing those inbred lines. Most of the resistance appeared to be transmitted to the hybrids form the male or restorer germplasm. There was a positive, but not absolute, relationship between inbred line resistance and hybrid resistance. Some combinations of resistant lines did not have the same or high level of resistance in hybrids. However, excellent resistance was obtained in other hybrids, indicating that breeders can develop more resistant germplasm and hybrids in the future.

Technical Abstract: A major factor limiting sunflower (Heliathus annuus L.) sunflower production in some sections of the U.S. has been the sunflower midge (Contarinia schulze Gagne) insect. For the past four years there has been a resurgence in the sunflower midge population, with a wider area affected that the previous large infestation. There has been little information published regarding the relationship between inbred lines and their hybrids for resistance to the sunflower midge. Therefore, the objectives of this investigation were to observe the variability among inbred lines of sunflower and to observe the inheritance of resistance in hybrids resulting from crosses among those lines. Significant differences were observed among maintainer (B-line) and restorer (R-line) inbred lines and among hybrids resulting from crosses between the B and R-lines. The general combining ability (GCA) of only the male was significant, indicating that male effects were much more important in controlling midge resistance than female effects. The ratio of the GCA to SCA was large, suggesting that additive gene effects were relatively more important that nonadditive gene effects. Some combinations of resistant lines did not have the same or high level of resistance in hybrids. However, excellent resistance was obtained in other hybrids, indicating that breeders can develop more resistant germplasm and hybrids in the future.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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