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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Managing Nematodes, Fungal Diseases and Thrips on Peanut with Pesticides and Crop Rotations of Bahiagrass, Corn, and Cotton.

Authors
item Johnson, Alva
item Minton, N - RETIRED/USDA ARS
item Brenneman, T - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Burton, Glenn
item Culbreath, A - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Gascho, G - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Baker, S - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item JOHNSON, WILEY

Submitted to: Peanut Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 26, 1999
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Root-knot nematodes, insects, and soilborne fungal diseases cause significant losses in yield and quality of peanuts in the southeastern United States each year. A 3-year (1991-1993) experiment demonstrated that aldicarb and aldicarb plus flutolanil suppressed numbers of root-knot nematodes in the soil each year compared to the untreated controls, and fewer nematodes occurred in peanut following 1 year and 2 years of cotton than bahiagrass, corn or continuous peanuts. Root and pod damage of peanut by root-knot nematodes was greater in flutolanil-treated and untreated plots than in aldicarb and aldicarb plus flutolanil-treated plots. Less damage occurred on peanut following 1 year of cotton and 2 years of bahiagrass, corn, or cotton than continuous peanut. Thrips damage to peanut was lower in aldicarb and aldicarb plus flutolanil-treated than other plots, but thrips damage was not affected by cropping systems. Yield dof peanut was consistently highest in aldicarb plus flutolanil-treated plots, intermediate in aldicarb and flutolanil-treated plots, and lowest in untreated plots. Also, yield of peanut was consistently higher following 1 year and 2 years of bahiagrass, corn, or cotton than continuous peanut. Our data demonstrate the sustainable benefits of yield increase from using two widely grown agronomic crops (corn and cotton), an improved pasture grass (Tifton 9 bahiagrass), and pesticide treatments for multiple-pest management in peanut production.

Technical Abstract: The influences of bahiagrass, corn, and cotton in rotation with peanut treated with and without aldicarb, flutolanil, and aldicarb plus flutolanil were studied for 3 years. Peanut yields following either 1 or 2 years of bahiagrass, corn, or cotton were higher than those of continuous peanut. Peanut yield means across cropping sequences and years were greatest in the ealdicarb plus flutolanil treated plots (5,270 kg/ha), intermediate in aldicarb (4,060 kg/ha), and flutolanil (4,590 kg/ha) treated plots, and least in untreated (3,690 kg/ha) plots. The increases in peanut yields obtained in response to cropping sequences and pesticide treatments resulted primarily from suppression of Meloidogyne arenaria, thrips, Sclerotium rolfsii, and Rhizoctonia solani population densities. Our data demonstrate the sustainable benefits and yield increase from using two widely grown agronomic crops (corn and cotton), bahiagrass, and pesticide treatments for multiple-pest management in peanut production.

Last Modified: 9/29/2014
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