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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Formation of External Waxy Particles by Adult Bemisia Argentifolii and Semidalis Flinti

Authors
item Nelson, Dennis
item Freeman, Thomas - NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIV
item Buckner, James
item HOELMER, KIM
item HAGLER, JAMES
item Jackson, Charles

Submitted to: National Research and Action Plan for Silver Leaf Whitefly
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 18, 1998
Publication Date: N/A

Technical Abstract: Semidalis flinti, dustywing predator in southwestern USA, active on shrubs/trees in areas around agriculture & urban areas where whiteflies reside between crops. Larvae/adults consume Bemisia eggs/nymphs; larvae 2000 eggs during development & adults 8.5 eggs + 8.8 nymphs per hr. Whiteflies & dustywings cover themselves with waxy particles. Whiteflies with a mixture of long-chain aldehydes & alcohols, from abdominal wax plates. The major components are 34 carbons in length in Bemisia & in greenhouse whiteflies 32 carbons. Dustywings cover themselves with waxy particles from individual wax pores. The end of each waxy ribbon curls back on itself to form a cylinder (particle) about one micrometer in diameter which breaks off. Cuticular lipids (plus waxy particles) were fatty acids (47%), alcohols (7%), hydrocarbons (20%), putative wax esters (4%), diacylglycerols (10%). Same lipids found in male/female dustywings. Major hydrocarbon 3,7,11-trimethylheptacosane, 70 ng/female & 50 ng/male. Free fatty acids 1000 ng/female & 1220 ng/male; major is tetracosanoic acid, 70% of free fatty acids. Alcohols a minor lipid class (6%) on dustywings. Whiteflies & dustywings cover themselves & surroundings with waxy particles but had completely different surface chemistry. Adult whiteflies had particles of long-chain aldehydes & alcohols as well as wax esters on the cuticle surface. Dustywings did not have long-chain aldehydes & little alcohol. Major component from dustywing was free fatty acids. They also had small amounts of methyl-branched hydrocarbons whereas whiteflies had very little hydrocarbon, either branched or straight chain.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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