Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Vitamin and Mineral Metabolism and Exercise Performance

Author
item Lukaski, Henry

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: September 15, 1998
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: As people combine the initiation of an exercise program with changes in diet to promote health and well being, interest grows in understanding the roles that nutrients play in this process. One question that arises is the need for supplemental vitamins and minerals. Experimental evidence indicates that the vast majority of physically active people obtain adequate vitamin and mineral intakes from food and beverages to meet population standards. Certain groups of physically active people may be at risk for decreased nutritional status. These athletes include young female ballet dances and gymnasts, long distance runners, wrestlers, and people who are attempting to lose weight by restricting food intake. To avoid nutritional problems, physically active people are encouraged to consume a diet that contains a variety of foods to maximize intake of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients. Concerns about the quality of an individual's diet should be evaluated by a registered dietitian. Use of single nutrient supplements should be avoided to prevent imbalances with other nutrients. If a nutritional supplement is used, it should contain all essential nutrients in amounts recommended to meet population standards. This information will be useful to researchers who seek new roles of essential nutrients in maintenance of health and physiological function, and professionals who provide nutritional guidance to physically active people.

Technical Abstract: As people combine the initiation of an exercise program with changes in diet to promote health and well being, interest grows in understanding the roles that nutrients play in this process. One question that arises is the need for supplemental vitamins and minerals. Experimental evidence indicates that the vast majority of physically active people obtain adequate vitamin and mineral intakes from food and beverages to meet population standards. Certain groups of physically active people may be at risk for decreased nutritional status. These athletes include young female ballet dances and gymnasts, long distance runners, wrestlers, and people who are attempting to lose weight by restricting food intake. To avoid nutritional problems, physically active people are encouraged to consume a diet that contains a variety of foods to maximize intake of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients. Concerns about the quality of an individual's diet should be evaluated by a registered dietitian. Use of single nutrient supplements should be avoided to prevent imbalances with other nutrients. If a nutritional supplement is used, it should contain all essential nutrients in amounts recommended to meet population standards. This information will be useful to researchers who seek new roles of essential nutrients in maintenance of health and physiological function, and professionals who provide nutritional guidance to physically active people.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page