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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Relationship of Watermelon Genotype and Ploidy to Incidence of Yellow Vine Disease

Authors
item Pair, Sammy
item Bruton, Benny

Submitted to: Cucurbitaceae Proceedings
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 3, 1998
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Producers lack satisfactory control strategies for yellow vine, a serious disease of watermelon and other cucurbit crops in Oklahoma and Central Texas. A bacterium has been associated with the disease and evidence suggests that the organism may be vectored by leafhoppers. The use of resistant cultivars offers the most reliable and long-term solution for combating plant pests. In 1997, we tested 21 watermelon cultivars representing open-pollinated, hybrid, and polyploid genotypes for resistance to yellow vine disease at Lane, OK. Results indicated that watermelon cultivar did not influence populations of cucumber beetle or squash bug. However, the percentage of yellow vine was significantly influenced by both cultivar and by ploidy level. Incidence of yellow vine ranged from 1.7 and 45.0 % affected in 'Sugar Baby'-4n and 'Klondike', respectively. Triploid seedless cultivars were 2.7 and 1.7 X more resistant, respectively, to yellow vine disease than open-pollinated and hybrid cultivars. Producers may benefit by including the more resistant seedless watermelons where yellow vine disease is prevalent.

Technical Abstract: Producers lack satisfactory control strategies for yellow vine, a serious vine decline disease of watermelon, Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum & Nakai, and other cucurbits in Oklahoma and Central Texas. A phloem-limited bacterium has been associated with the disease and evidence suggests that the organism may be vectored by leafhoppers. In 1997, 21 watermelon cultivars representing open-pollinated, hybrid, and polyploid genotypes were screened for resistance to the yellow vine disease. Results indicated that watermelon cultivar did not influence populations of cucumber beetle or squash bug. However, the percentage of yellow vine was significantly influenced by both cultivar and by ploidy level. Incidence of yellow vine affected plants ranged from 1.7 and 45.0 % in 'Sugar Baby'(4n) and 'Klondike', respectively. Diploid open-pollinated and hybrid cultivars had d63 and 41% higher incidence of yellow vine disease, respectively, as compared to triploid seedless cultivars. Increased leaf pubescence and other factors are discussed as potential mechanisms for the observed difference in incidence of yellow vine disease.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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