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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Larra bicolor (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae: Larrinae) collected in pheromone- and phenylacetaldehyde-baited traps

Authors
item Meagher, Robert
item Frank, J. - ENT DEPT, UNIV. OF FL

Submitted to: Florida Entomologist
Publication Type: Research Notes
Publication Acceptance Date: July 14, 1998
Publication Date: September 1, 1998
Citation: Meagher Jr, R.L., Frank, J.H. 1998. LARRA BICOLOR (HYMENOPTERA: SPHECIDAE: LARRINAE) COLLECTED IN PHEROMONE- AND PHENYLACETALDEHYDE-BAITED TRAPS. Florida Entomologist. 81(4):555-556.

Interpretive Summary: Scientists at the Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology, Gainesville, Florida, are developing additional compounds that may aid in monitoring populations of different moth pests of field crops. One of the compounds tested is a floral extract known as phenylacetaldehyde. In the course of trapping in cotton fields for moth pests using phenylacetaldehyde as bait, several species of wasps and bees were also collected. One species collected was the wasp, Larra bicolor, which is a natural enemy of mole crickets. Mole crickets in the southeastern United States cause extensive damage to homeowner lawns and to golf course greens. Larra was imported from Bolivia and released in Alachua County, Florida, in the late 1980s by entomologists from the University of Florida. However, there has been no way to sample for field populations of this important natural enemy. Our work demonstrates a potential technique and lure to collect Larra, and may aid researchers in determining the dispersal and effectiveness of this wasp.

Technical Abstract: Larra bicolor was collected as a nontarget species in white bucket traps baited with sex pheromones and the floral attractant phenylacetaldehyde in an agricultural area in northwestern Alachua County, Florida. The first wasp was collected in mid-June, but larger numbers of wasps were collected in late September and early October. More wasps were collected in traps that had phenylacetaldehyde as a lure. This collection method may aid researchers in determining the dispersal and effectiveness of this natural enemy of Scapteriscus mole crickets.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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