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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Application of Epic Within An Integrated Modelling System to Evaluate Soil Erosion in the Canadian Prairies

Authors
item Izaurralde, R - BATTELLE PNNL
item Gassman, P - CARD
item Bouzaher, A - WORLD BANK
item Tajek, J - CLBRR, AG CANADA
item Laksminarayan, P - AMERICAN EXPRESS
item Dumanski, J - WORLD BANK
item KINIRY, JAMES

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: November 2, 1994
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: A computer simulation model called EPIC was used to assess the impact of farm policies on soil degradation in the Canadian Prairies. This chapter describes how the model was applied and how the results were interpreted and analyzed. The model contains ten sections that simulate the major agro-ecosystem processes. EPIC simulations were performed on the dominant soils in three provinces, with weather based on 30-year climate normals. Nearly 20,000 simulations were performed for this study. Predicted yields of wheat and canola followed expected trends. EPIC simulated that wind erosion was dominant in Saskatchewan and Manitoba and that water erosion was more important in Alberta. Simulated rates of soil erosion agreed well with USLE estimates in a selected area of Alberta. The model's estimates of crop yields and erosion rates were realistic and within bounds of expectations and experimental results.

Technical Abstract: The EPIC model was used to assess the impact of farm policies on soil degradation in Canada. This chapter presents methodology and discusses results from EPIC's erosion evaluation of the Canadian Prairies. The model contains ten modules describing major agro-ecosystem p ses. EPIC simulations were performed on the dominant soils in three provinces, with weather based on 30-year climate normals. Nearly 20,000 simulations were performed for this study. Predicted yields of wheat and canola followed expected trends. EPIC simulated that wind erosion was dominant in Saskatchewan and Manitoba and that water erosion was more important in Alberta. Simulated rates of soil erosion agreed well with USLE estimates in a selected area of Alberta. The model's estimates of crop yields and erosion rates were realistic and within bounds of expectations and experimental results.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014
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