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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Introduction and Overview

Authors
item Brewer, Gary - NDSU
item Charlet, Laurence

Submitted to: Thomas Say Publications in Entomology
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: August 27, 1998
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Biological control is a desirable tactic in the struggle to maintain pest populations below economic levels because it offers the potential of sustained & environmentally benign pest mgt. compared to other approaches. To date, most biol. control efforts have focused on nonindigenous or exotic pests; native pests have often been overlooked as biol. control candidates. Nechols (Chap. 2) compares exotic & native pests & looks at possible ways to achieve biol. control. Wiedenmann & Smith (Chap. 3) discuss the use of the novel association approach & the circumstances in which novel parasitoids should be used against native pests. Landis & Marino (Chap. 4) look at conservation of native natural enemies, espe cially those associated with lepidopterous herbivores of crops of the north-central U.S. Hough-Goldstein (Chap. 5) looks at augmentative biol. control using the Colorado potato beetle as an example. Constraints, advantages & factors favoring augmentative control are discussed. The final chapters focus on mgt. of indigenous pest complexes associated with native North American crops. Mahr (Chap. 6) details how biol. control has been developed as part of an integrated pest mgt. system for cranberry. In Chap. 7, Charlet discusses the native pest fauna of wild & cultivated sunflower & their parasitoids. Reid (Chap. 8) reviews how profitable pecan production relies on conservation of native natural enemies, natural levels of plant resistance & integrated crop mgt.

Technical Abstract: Biological control is a desirable tactic in the struggle to maintain pest populations below economic levels because it offers the potential of sustained & environmentally benign pest mgt. compared to other approaches. To date, most biol. control efforts have focused on nonindigenous or exotic pests; native pests have often been overlooked as biol. control candidates. Nechols (Chap. 2) compares exotic & native pests & looks at possible ways to achieve biol. control. Wiedenmann & Smith (Chap. 3) discuss the use of the novel association approach & the circumstances in which novel parasitoids should be used against native pests. Landis & Marino (Chap. 4) look at conservation of native natural enemies, espe cially those associated with lepidopterous herbivores of crops of the north-central U.S. Hough-Goldstein (Chap. 5) looks at augmentative biol. control using the Colorado potato beetle as an example. Constraints, advantages & factors favoring augmentative control are discussed. The final chapters focus on mgt. of indigenous pest complexes associated with native North American crops. Mahr (Chap. 6) details how biol. control has been developed as part of an integrated pest mgt. system for cranberry. In Chap. 7, Charlet discusses the native pest fauna of wild & cultivated sunflower & their parasitoids. Reid (Chap. 8) reviews how profitable pecan production relies on conservation of native natural enemies, natural levels of plant resistance & integrated crop mgt.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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