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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Development of High Linoleic Sunflower Hybrids for the U.S.

Authors
item Miller, Jerry
item Vick, Brady

Submitted to: Proceedings Sunflower Research Workshop
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: February 15, 1997
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Stabilizing high quality factors in vegetable oil, such as linoleic acid, could give sunflower a competitive advantage in some U.S. markets as well as worldwide for export. At the present, sunflower varies considerably in fatty acid content, depending on the latitude and heat units in the area where sunflower hybrids are grown. Linoleic acid levels often drop 20% in higher temperature growing conditions. In crosses of germplasm obtained from Australia with U.S. adapted materials, three maintainer lines and two restorer lines were found to have elevated levels of linoleic acid. When these lines were crossed together to produce hybrids, these hybrids were not only higher than normal check hybrids in linoleic fatty acid when planted in North Dakota, they were quite stable in producing high levels of linoleic acid when planted in Texas. These hybrids would provide a stability factor to fatty acid that has not been reported in sunflower hybrids to date.

Technical Abstract: An objective of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) breeders for many years has been to stabilize the fatty acid levels of sunflower oil. At the present time, sunflower varies considerably in fatty acid content, depending on the latitude and heat units in the area where sunflower hybrids are grown. Linoleic levels of North Dakota grown sunflower usually averages 68 to 70%, whereas linoleic levels of Texas grown sunflower usually averages 50 to 55%. In 1990, germplasm populations were obtained from Australia and crossed with U.S. adapted lines. From these crosses, three maintainer lines and two restorer lines were found to have elevated levels of linoleic acid. When these lines were crossed together to produce hybrids, these hybrids were 8.3% higher in linoleic acid than normal check hybrids. The advantage of the high linoleic hybrids over the checks in Texas was 19.2%. Not only were the hybrids higher in linoleic acid, but produced nearly the same linoleic acid in both environments. These hybrids would provide a stability factor to fatty acid that has not been reported in sunflower hybrids to date.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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