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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Trace Element Content of Selected Fruits

Author
item Miller-Ihli, Nancy

Submitted to: Journal of Food Composition and Analysis
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 10, 1996
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The public is clearly aware of the benefit of eating 5 fruits and vegetables each day for health promotion and disease prevention. Fruits may be considered a good source of many of the trace elements of nutritional interest. In this study, calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, sodium and zinc were determined in 32 fruit samples. Samples were homogenized and wet ashed using nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide and digestates were analyzed using flame atomic absorption spectrometry and flame atomic emission spectrometry. Data are reported in mg/100g and many are compared with literature values. Data for less commonly consumed fruits such as star fruit, mangos, papayas, and plantains are included. Fruits are identified which may be considered good sources of the specified trace elements based on the FDA definition that a serving contains 10% of the Daily Value. These data will be useful to analysts interested in methods for measuring trace elements in foods and to nutritionists and health professionals interested in food composition data.

Technical Abstract: Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and flame atomic emission spectrometry (AES) were used to determine calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, sodium, and zinc in 32 fruits. Samples were wet ashed using nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide and calibration was accomplished using calibration against aqueous standards. Data obtained are reported in mg/100 g and are compared with literature values. Data for less commonly consumed fruits such as tangerines, nectarines, kiwi, star fruit (carambola), mangos, papayas, and plantains are also presented. Fruits are identified which may be considered good sources of the trace elements studied based on the FDA definition that a serving contains 10% of the Daily Value. When possible, variability in elemental content for different varieties is studied.

Last Modified: 7/31/2014