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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effect of Environment on Flower Bud Density in Peach and Nectarine

Authors
item Okie, William
item Werner, Dennis - NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 30, 1996
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Spring frosts often kill all or a portion of the flowers on peach trees in the southeastern United States. More flowers per tree is one way to increase the likelihood of producing a crop. We measured the bud density of 25 peach and nectarine varieties grown in similar orchards in Georgia and North Carolina for 3 years. The type of variety made the biggest difference in density, much more so than differences in location or weather. Agua 6-4 (from Mexico) and Eagle Beak (from China) had the highest densities (1.66 and 1.46 buds per node, respectively). Lowest densities were on "O'Henry" (0.42), "Topaz" (0.39), and "Ta Tao" (0.31). Varieties selected for high bud density at one location can be expected to have high densities at other locations of comparable chilling. This knowledge will enhance the development of peaches exhibiting greater fruit set.

Technical Abstract: Spring frosts often kill all or a portion of the flowers on peach trees in the southeastern United States. Increased flower bud density is one mechanism that increases the likelihood of sufficient flowers surviving to produce a crop. The effect of environment on flower bud density (buds/node) was studied using 2 locations over three years. Bud density of f25 peach and nectarine cultivars grown in completely randomized designs wa measured in Georgia and North Carolina. Genotypic variability was greater than that due to location or year effects. Agua 6-4 from Mexico and Eagle Beak from China had the highest densities (1.66 and 1.46 buds per node, respectively). Lowest densities were on O'Henry (0.42), Topaz (0.39), and Ta Tao (0.31). Cultivars selected for high bud density at one location can be expected to have high densities at other locations of comparable chilling.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
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