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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Position of the American Dietetic Association: Dietary Supplements

Author
item Hunt, Janet

Submitted to: Journal Of The American Dietetic Association
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: October 29, 1995
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: This paper was written by invitation from the American Dietetic Association to support the following position statement: It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that the best nutritional strategy for promoting optimal health and reducing the risk of chronic disease is to obtain adequate nutrients from a wide variety of foods. Dietary supplementation is not usually necessary, but may be beneficial in some circumstances, when indicated by well-accepted scientific evidence of safety and effectiveness. The rationale for relying on a variety of foods rather than supplements to promote nutritional health, and the circumstances in which supplementation may be beneficial are reviewed, referencing recent scientific literature. Emphasis is placed on the need for sound scientific evidence to determine both the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplementation. The Dietary Guidelines and the Food Guide Pyramid issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Department of Health and Human Services are cited as useful public guidance for choosing a variety of foods for good health.

Technical Abstract: This paper was written by invitation from the American Dietetic Association to support the following position statement: It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that the best nutritional strategy for promoting optimal health and reducing the risk of chronic disease is to obtain adequate nutrients from a wide variety of foods. Dietary supplementation is not usually necessary, but may be beneficial in some circumstances, when indicated by well-accepted scientific evidence of safety and effectiveness. The rationale for relying on a variety of foods rather than supplements to promote nutritional health, and the circumstances in which supplementation may be beneficial are reviewed, referencing recent scientific literature. Emphasis is placed on the need for sound scientific evidence to determine both the safety and effectiveness of dietary supplementation. The Dietary Guidelines and the Food Guide Pyramid issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Department of Health and Human Services are cited as useful public guidance for choosing a variety of foods for good health.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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