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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Registration of Alloplasmic and Euplasmic Luke Soft White Winter Germplasms

Author
item Allan, Robert

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 15, 1996
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Ten pairs of alloplasmic (alien cytoplasm) and euplasmic (normal cytoplasm) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) germplasm were developed in Luke soft white winter wheat. The variety Luke was grown during 1972 to 1982 in the northern-summerfallow-intermediate rainfall areas of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Ten alien donor cytoplasms were substituted for Luke normal wheat cytoplasm. The cytoplasms were derived from six species of Aegilops, two T. macha, one T. turgidum and one Haynaldia villosa. Detailed agronomic and quality comparisons were made between the paired alloplasmic and euplasmic members of the ten donor sets. Eight of the cytoplasms did not deleteriously affect grain yield and could be used to reduce genetic vulnerability of wheat to potentially destructive pathogens. The potential for exploiting heterotic effects caused by nuclear/cytoplasmic interactions appears to be low with this material. The germplasms may be useful for other purposes, such as dihaploid breeding, attaining cytoplasmic diversity, characterizing various cytoplasmic organelles, and faciliting wide crosses. These germplasm were jointly released by USDA-ARS and the Washington Agricultural Research Center in 1994.

Technical Abstract: Ten pairs of alloplasmic and euplasmic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) germplasms were developed in the soft white winter (SWW) cultivar 'Luke'. Alien donor cytoplasms substituted for Luke T. aestivum cytoplasm included 6 Aegilops sp., 2 T. macha, 1 T. turgidum and 1 Haynaldia villosa (Dasypyrum villosum). The Aegilops species were Ae. squarrosa (T. Tauchcii), Ae. ventricosa (T. ventricosum), Ae. cylindrica, (T. cylindricum), Ar. variabilis (T. variabile), Ae. uniaristata (T. uniaristatum), and Ae. juvenalis (T. juvenale). Luke was grown during 1972 to 1982 in the intermediate rainfall, northern summerfallow areas of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The germplasms were jointly released by USDA-ARS and the Washington Agricultural Research Center in 1994. Comparisons were made between the alloplasmic and euplasmic members of the ten donor sets. Donor cytoplasms causing the most effect on various agronomic and quality traits were T. macha-8, H. villosa, Ae. cylindrica, Ae. variabilis, and Ae. uniaristata. Cytoplasms having the most deleterious effects on yield and related components were Ae. cylindrica and Ae. variabilis. When grain yields were pooled across five test-sites, the A members of Ae. variabilis (P<0.05) and Ae. juvenalis (P<0.10) had lower mean yields than their E members. The potential for exploiting heterotic effects caused by nuclear/cytoplasmic interactions appears to be low with this material. The germplasms may be useful for other purposes, such as dihaploid breeding, attaining cytoplasmic diversity, characterizing various cytoplasmic organelles, and faciliting wide crosses.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014
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