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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Decreasing Sedimentation Loss from Surface Irrigation into Riparian Areas

Authors
item Sojka, Robert
item Lentz, Rodrick - UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO

Submitted to: Water Resource Center Publication
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: December 8, 1994
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Pacific Northwest surface waters and riparian areas are severely degraded by sediments carried in irrigation return flows and by the pesticides and nutrients they release, which contaminate the water and promote algal growth. The need to preserve and restore the quantity and quality of our water resources is shared by all segments of society, including consumers and farmers. In doing their part farmers must be able to use conservation measures that are attractive to him as a manager, that are effective, and that do not prevent him from producing the cheap abundance of food demanded by the consuming public. The practices that meet these criteria will differ for every farm. This paper briefly summarizes twelve categories of on-farm soil conservation practices that have been pioneered by the USDA Agricultural Research Service's Northwest Irrigation and Soils Research Lab in Kimberly, Idaho. The focus is on systems for furrow irrigation. Estimates of effectiveness are presented for each category together with short statements of advantages and drawbacks for each. In some instances costs and expected returns are discussed as well. A comprehensive list of source publications is presented fur user reference.

Technical Abstract: Pacific Northwest surface waters and riparian areas are severely degraded by sediments carried in irrigation return flows and by the pesticides and nutrients they release, which contaminate the water and promote algal growth. The need to preserve and restore the quantity and quality of our water resources is shared by all segments of society, including consumers and farmers. In doing their part farmers must be able to use conservation measures that are attractive to him as a manager, that are effective, and that do not prevent him from producing the cheap abundance of food demanded by the consuming public. The practices that meet these criteria will differ for every farm. This paper briefly summarizes twelve categories of on-farm soil conservation practices that have been pioneered by the USDA Agricultural Research Service's Northwest Irrigation and Soils Research Lab in Kimberly, Idaho. The focus is on systems for furrow irrigation. Estimates of effectiveness are presented for each category together with short statements of advantages and drawbacks for each. In some instances costs and expected returns are discussed as well. A comprehensive list of source publications is presented fur user reference.

Last Modified: 12/24/2014
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