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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Improved Control of Stripe Rust in Cereal Crops

Location: Wheat Genetics, Quality Physiology and Disease Research

Title: High genome heterozygosity and endemic genetic recombination in the wheat stripe rust fungus

Authors
item Zhen, W. -
item Huang, Lili -
item Huang, Jinqun -
item Wang, Xiaojie -
item Chen, Xianming
item Zhao, Jie -
item Guo, Jun -
item Zhuang, Hua -
item Qiu, Chuangzhao -
item Liu, Jie -
item Liu, Huiquan -
item Huang, Xueling -
item Pei, Guoliang -
item Zhan, Gangming -
item Tang, Chunlei -
item Cheng, Yulin -
item Liu, Minjie -
item Zhang, Jinshan -
item Zhao, Zhongtao -
item Zhang, Shijie -
item Han, Qingmei -
item Han, Dejun -
item Zhang, Hongzhang -
item Zhao, Jing -
item Gao, Xiaoning -
item Wang, Jianfeng -
item Ni, Peixiang -
item Dong, Wei -
item Yang, Linfeng -
item Yang, Huanming -
item Xu, Jinrong -
item Zhang, Gengyun -
item Kang, Zhenshen -

Submitted to: Nature Communications
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 26, 2013
Publication Date: October 23, 2013
Repository URL: http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2013/131023/ncomms3673/full/ncomms3673.html
Citation: 2013. High genome heterozygosity and endemic genetic recombination in the wheat stripe rust fungus. Nature Communications. 4:2673 (1-10).

Interpretive Summary: Stripe rust is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat. Here we report a 110-Mb draft sequence of stripe rust pathogen isolate CY32, obtained using a ‘fosmid-to-fosmid’ strategy, to better understand its race evolution and pathogenesis. The fungal pathogen genome is highly heterozygous and contains 25,288 protein-coding genes. Compared with non-obligate fungal pathogens, the pathogen has a more diverse gene composition and more genes encoding secreted proteins. Re-sequencing analysis indicates significant genetic variation among six isolates collected from different continents. Approximately 35% of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are in the coding sequence regions, and half of them are non-synonymous. High genetic diversity in the pathogen suggests that sexual reproduction may have a role in the origin of different regional races. Our results show the effectiveness of the ‘fosmid-to-fosmid’ strategy for sequencing dikaryotic genomes and the feasibility of genome analysis to understand race evolution in the stripe rust pathogen and other obligate pathogens.

Technical Abstract: Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat. Here we report a 110-Mb draft sequence of Pst isolate CY32, obtained using a ‘fosmid-to-fosmid’ strategy, to better understand its race evolution and pathogenesis. The Pst genome is highly heterozygous and contains 25,288 protein-coding genes. Compared with non-obligate fungal pathogens, Pst has a more diverse gene composition and more genes encoding secreted proteins. Re-sequencing analysis indicates significant genetic variation among six isolates collected from different continents. Approximately 35% of SNPs are in the coding sequence regions, and half of them are non-synonymous. High genetic diversity in Pst suggests that sexual reproduction has an important role in the origin of different regional races. Our results show the effectiveness of the ‘fosmid-to-fosmid’ strategy for sequencing dikaryotic genomes and the feasibility of genome analysis to understand race evolution in Pst and other obligate pathogens.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
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