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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: HIGHER DIPTERA PESTS OF LIVESTOCK, POULTRY, AND HUMAN HEALTH: INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT AND ADULT BIOLOGY

Location: Mosquito and Fly Research Unit

Title: Laboratory colonization of the blow flies, Chrysomya megacephala (Diptera: Calliphoridae) and Chrysomya rufifacies (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

Authors
item Swiger, Sonja -
item HOGSETTE, JEROME
item Butler, Jerry -

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 6, 2014
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Studies were designed to develop laboratory colonization methods for Chrysomya rufifacies and utilize Chrysomya megacephala as its larval food source. Both fly species were collected in the wild and easily colonized. Ch. rufifacies and Ch. megacephala developed from egg to adult in 16.2 and 20.4 d, respectively. Ch. megacephala prefered a lower temperature for development and maintenance than did Ch. rufifacies, and Ch. rufifacies benefited from blood meal as a protein supplement to enhance egg production. Ch. rufifacies larvae were not observed to be cannibalistic and larvae of Ch. megacephala were not needed to serve as prey.

Technical Abstract: Chrysomya rufifacies is a blow fly commonly found in corpses at crime scene investigations. This study was designed to develop laboratory colonization methods for Ch. rufifacies and utilize Chrysomya megacephala as its larval food source. Both fly species were collected in the wild and easily colonized using conditioned chicken as a medium for oviposition and larval development. Ch. rufifacies and Ch. megacephala developed from egg to adult in 16.2 and 20.4 d, respectively. Ch. megacephala prefered a lower development and maintenance temperature than Ch. rufifacies, and Ch. rufifacies benefited from blood meal as a protein supplement to enhance egg production. Ch. rufifacies larvae were not observed to be cannibalistic and larvae of Ch. megacephala were not needed to serve as prey.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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