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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Production and Disease and Pest Management of Horticultural Crops

Location: Southern Horticultural Research

Title: Ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) captures using colored traps in southeast Tennessee and south Mississippi

Authors
item Werle, Christopher
item Bray, A -
item Oliver, J -
item Blythe, E -
item Sampson, Blair

Submitted to: Journal of Entomological Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 7, 2014
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: beetles have been listed as the second-worst arthropod pest for profitable nursery production in the southeastern U.S. We tested 13 different colors of ethanol-baited traps to see which would yield the highest captures of ambrosia beetles. Opaque and red traps had significantly higher ambrosia beetle captures than did yellow and white traps, and black traps also captured significantly more than white traps. While further research is needed to explain the efficacy of the opaque traps, we conclude that industry-standard black traps are adequately effective for ambrosia beetle monitoring programs.

Technical Abstract: Ambrosia beetles have become a major problem for nursery production, with controls centered around an accurate monitoring program. While the use of semiochemicals by ambrosia beetles is well understood, their potential use of visual cues including color remains relatively understudied. Field tests were performed in Mississippi and Tennessee to determine response of the ambrosia beetle community for 13 different colors (black, blue, brown, clear, grey, green, lavender, opaque, orange, purple, red, white and yellow) of ethanol-baited traps. All trap colors were analyzed with a spectrophotometer to quantify spectral reflectance. Mean ambrosia beetle capture from opaque and red traps (60 and 54 respectively) was significantly higher than from yellow and white traps (30 and 28 respectively), and mean capture from black traps was also significantly higher than from white traps (51 and 28 respectively). However, captures from each of the aforementioned five colors were not significantly different from the other eight colors tested. While further research is needed to explain the efficacy of the opaque traps, we conclude that industry-standard black traps are adequately effective for ambrosia beetle monitoring programs, whereas yellow or white traps should not be used.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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