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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Management of Temperate-Adapted Fruit, Nut, and Specialty Crop Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: National Clonal Germplasm Repository (Corvallis, Oregon)

Title: Medium-term in vitro storage as a complementary germplasm preservation technique

Author
item Reed, Barbara

Submitted to: Abstract of International Horticultural Congress
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 15, 2014
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Preservation of vegetatively propagated crops may be accomplished using a range of old and new technologies. Collections in fields, potted plants, or some cases whole plants stored under cool to cold conditions are complemented by tissue cultures, refrigerator storage of tissue cultures, and cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen. The use of complementary storage techniques is important for successful germplasm preservation and refrigerated tissue culture storage is one important technique for germplasm in an active genebank. Shoot cultures of temperate plants are routinely stored at -1 to 5°C for as long as 4 years without subculture. Sub-tropical and tropical plants can be held at sub-normal culture temperatures (15-18°C) for long periods as well. This storage form is important for active collections and provides a readily accessible form of plant materials for distribution to the user community. This presentation will describe the possibilities and uses of tissue culture storage for germplasm preservation of vegetatively propagated crops.

Technical Abstract: A Germplasm preservation of vegetatively propagated crops may be accomplished using a range of old and new technologies. Field collections, potted plants, or some cases whole plants stored under cool to cold conditions are complemented by in vitro culture, in vitro storage, and cryopreservation. The use of complementary storage techniques is important for successful germplasm preservation and in vitro storage is one important technique for germplasm in an active genebank. In vitro cultures of temperate plants are routinely stored at -1 to 5°C for as long as 4 years without subculture. Sub-tropical and tropical plants can be held at sub-normal temperatures (15-18°C) for long periods as well. This storage form is important for active collections and provides a readily accessible form of germplasm for distribution to the user community. This presentation will describe the possibilities and uses of in vitro storage for germplasm preservation.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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