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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Genetic Enhancement of Common Bean Using Exotic Germplasm for Biotic and Abiotic Stress Tolerance

Location: Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research

Title: Response of Andean and Mesoamerican common bean genotypes to inoculation with rhizobium strains.

Authors
item Racancoj, A. -
item Vargas, A. -
item Rosas, J. -
item Estevez DE Jensen, Consuelo -
item Beaver, J. -
item Porch, Timothy

Submitted to: Bean Improvement Cooperative Annual Report
Publication Type: Research Notes
Publication Acceptance Date: January 28, 2014
Publication Date: April 1, 2014
Citation: Racancoj, A.J., Vargas, A., Rosas, J.C., Estevez De Jensen, C., Beaver, J.S., Porch Clay, T.G. 2014. Response of Andean and Mesoamerican common bean genotypes to inoculation with rhizobium strains. Bean Improvement Cooperative Annual Report. p. 245-246.

Interpretive Summary: In most common bean production regions of Latin America, inoculants, composed of symbiotic bacteria that fix nitrogen in symbiosis with legume plants, are rarely used by farmers in spite of several studies that demonstrate the importance of inoculation on commercial production of legume crops. This study investigated specific bean host plant-Rhizobium strain (symbiotic bacteria) interactions that could facilitate the selection of superior Rhizobia with greater response to inoculation, and with the potential to increase bean productivity in nitrogen limited soils. The results show that nodulation response of bean genotypes was significantly influenced by Rhizobium strain and common bean variety, but not by their interaction. On average, Andean common bean varieties had greater nodulation and plant dry weight than Mesoamerican varieties.

Technical Abstract: In most common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production regions of Latin America, inoculants are rarely used by farmers in spite of several studies that demonstrate the importance of Rhizobium inoculation on commercial production of legume crops. This study investigated specific bean host plant-Rhizobium strain interactions that could facilitate the selection of superior symbionts with greater response to inoculation, and with the potential to increase bean productivity in N limited soils. The results show that nodulation response of bean genotypes was significantly influenced by Rhizobium strains and genotype treatments, but not by their interaction. On average, Andean genotypes had greater nodulation and plant dry weight than Mesoamerican genotypes.

Last Modified: 9/22/2014
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