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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DIETARY MODULATION OF OBESITY-RELATED CANCER BY SELENIUM Title: Mechanisms linking dietary fiber, gut microbiota and colon cancer prevention

Authors
item Zeng, Huawei
item Lazarova, Darina -
item Bordonaro, Michael -

Submitted to: World Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 15, 2014
Publication Date: February 15, 2014
Citation: Zeng, H., Lazarova, D.L., Bordonaro, M. 2014. Mechanisms linking dietary fiber, gut microbiota and colon cancer prevention. World Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology. 6(2):41-51.

Interpretive Summary: Many epidemiological and experimental studies indicate that dietary fiber intake is inversely associated with colon cancer risk. Dietary fiber decreases the risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, cardiovascular disease, colon cancer, and improves immunity by modulating the gut bacterial composition. Dietary fiber modulates our health at nearly every level, and in every organ system, via complicated modes of action, many of which remain to be determined. Recent findings demonstrate the ability of dietary fiber to reduce the contact time of carcinogens within the intestinal lumen and to promote healthy gut bacteria, which modifies the host’s metabolism in various ways. Further elucidation of the mechanisms by which dietary fiber-dependent changes in gut bacteria enhance bile acid deconjugation, produce short chain fatty acids, and modulate inflammatory bioactive substances can lead to a better understanding of the beneficial role of dietary fiber. This article reviews the current knowledge concerning the mechanisms via which dietary fiber protects against colon cancer. The information will be useful for scientists and health-care professionals who are interested in dietary fiber intake and cancer prevention.

Technical Abstract: Many epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that dietary fiber plays an important role in colon cancer prevention. These findings may relate to the ability of fiber to reduce the contact time of carcinogens within the intestinal lumen and to promote healthy gut microbiota, which modifies the host’s metabolism in various ways. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which dietary fiber-dependent changes in gut microbiota enhance bile acid deconjugation, produce short chain fatty acids, and modulate inflammatory bioactive substances can lead to a better understanding of the beneficial role of dietary fiber. This article reviews the current knowledge concerning the mechanisms via which dietary fiber protects against colon cancer.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
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